Luppitt Inn

Devon - Luppitt

A historic pub interior of national importance

Listed Status: Not listed


Luppitt
EX14 4RT

Tel: (01404) 891613

Real Ale: Yes

View on: Whatpub

NATIONAL INVENTORY. A rare example of a simple, unspoilt farmhouse pub of the type that would have been common a couple of generations ago, but is now virtually extinct. It has been in the same family ownership for over a century and still has a few acres attached for rearing sheep. The building itself is a modest, two-storey Victorian affair, built of local stone. The entrance is in the yard and the pub part occupies two rooms with a red quarry-tiled hallway between them. The room in regular use, on the right, is tiny and has nothing at all sophisticated about it – a simple servery with a few shelves and beer drawn direct from a polypin behind the counter. The left-hand room was used for meetings and overspill from the main bar but is now largely disused. Outside gents’ and ladies’ loos. At the time of writing, only open Thursday and Saturday evenings from 8pm

A rare example of a simple, unspoiled farmhouse pub of the type that was common years ago but now virtually extinct. It has been in the same family ownership for over 100 years and is still part of a working farm run by other members of the family so don't be surprised if you find chickens in the yard. Other Heritage Pubs with working farms attached and run by the licensee or their family members are the Quiet Woman, Earl Sterndale; Victoria Arms, Worton ; New Cross Inn, Court Henry ; and Dyffryn Arms, Pontfaen . The building itself is a modest two-storey Victorian one, built of local stone (rendered at rear) with a slate roof. The entrance to the pub is in the yard and the pub part occupies two rooms on the north side with an entry between the two into a quarry-tiled hallway.

The room in regular use being that on the right containing the servery. It has a stable door and don't be surprised if a customer slides the bolt after you have entered to keep it closed! There is nothing sophisticated, only a simple match-boarded counter which could be 100 years old and with a door missing and the flap permanently opened, a few simple shelves and beer drawn direct from casks (nowadays more likely to be a poly barrel) stillaged behind the bar. The room is so small that you will find you are quickly brought into conversation with others or you may be encouraged to test your skill on the various puzzles strewn over the table.

The small room on the left has a (1930s ?) brick fireplace. What at first glance looks like a flagstone floor in both rooms is in fact army surplus rubber matting installed just after WWII that came from nearby USAF Dunkerswell laid on a concrete floor. The only food sold is crisps and nuts. Outside gents' and ladies' across the yard. Open Mon-Sat. evenings only from 7 pm to 10.30 pm but this is subject to change so best to ring to check before travelling.

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