New Cross Inn

West Wales - Court Henry

A historic pub interior of national importance

Listed Status: Not listed


Court Henry
SA32 8SD

OS ref: SN55102380

Tel: (01558) 668276

View on: Whatpub

This externally unprepossessing pub is set at a junction in the northern part of a somewhat sprawly village and is still part of a 180-acre livestock farm. The pub opened in 1909 with a couple of celebratory dinners on 18 March – see the pair of preserved framed tickets. The small public bar with its red and black quarry-tiled floor retains a plain match-boarded counter, simple shelving behind and a wooden fire surround, above which is a Truman, Hanbury & Buxton advertising mirror. Originally there was also a smoking room (note a door on the left of the porch) but this became part of the living quarters in the 1960s. At this time the old stables to the right were converted into a large restaurant/new lounge that can hold 100 diners but this impacts scarcely at all. Open only Sat from 7pm, Sun 12–3.

This pub is a truly remarkable survival - still part of a 200-acre livestock farm, it celebrated its 100th.birthday in 2009 and the public bar has survived virtually without change. Another remarkable fact is that we know to the day when it opened – 18 March 1909 - as invitations to the opening dinner are preserved in a frame on the mantelshelf. The 100th birthday celebrations lasted three days and the pub was featured on TV. In the past it was quite common for pub-keeping to be combined with some other livelihood but it is rare these days. The small public bar with its red and black quarry-tile floor retains a match-boarded counter, simple shelving behind and a wooden fire-surround, complete with shelving and small turned balusters and a 'Truman, Hanbury & Buxton & Co Burton Ales' mirror above. The only modern item is some leatherette fixed seating from the late 1960s. Note the old opener on the counter that was used for taking corks out of beer bottles.

When built the pub consisted of the public bar and also a smoking room - note a door on the left of the porch - but this other small room became part of the living quarters in the 1960s. At this time the old stables to the right were converted into a large new restaurant-lounge that can hold 100 diners. Accessed through a pair of doors on the right of the bar with a small hatch to the side of the bar for service and ply panelled walls it impacts little on the old bar. It is used for meals on a Saturday evening and also one sitting at 12.30pm for an amazingly good value three-course Sunday roast lunch for which a booking is essential.

Other Heritage Pubs with working farms attached and run by the licensee or their family members are the Luppitt Inn, Luppitt ; Quiet Woman, Earl Sterndale; Victoria Arms, Worton ; and Dyffryn Arms, Pontfaen .

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