Cresselly Arms

West Wales - Cresswell Quay

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: II


Cresswell Quay
SA68 0TE

Tel: (01646) 651210

Email: evanscolin@live.co.uk

Real Ale: Yes

Real Cider: Yes

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

A fine, delightfully simple riverside pub which was in the same family hands from 1896 to 1981, hence the lack of change. The only significant one has been the cutting of a narrow opening in the dividing wall to the former kitchen and pantry in about 1981 to expand the public bar and slightly extend the bar counter. To the rear right is a further room, which has been brought into public use in recent years. Beer is still served from the jug from casks stillaged in the servery.

Only the most minor of changes have been made to the unspoilt public bar of this out-of-the way pub, which remained in the Davies family from 1896 to 1981. This is one of only two pubs left in Wales where you are served beer in the most traditional of ways – from casks on stillage behind the counter into a jug and then from the jug into your glass – the other is the Dyffryn Arms, Pontfaen.

Other Heritage Pubs still using a jug to serve at least one real ale are the Barley Mow, Kirk Ireton, Derbyshire; Holly Bush, Makeney, Derbyshire; Star, Bath, Somerset; Anchor, High Offley, Staffordshire; and Falcon, Arncliffe, North Yorkshire.

This fine creeper covered 18th-century house beside a tidal creek was remodelled and opened as a pub in the 1880s. Alice Davies ran it from 1961 until 1981 when she was in her 90s and the oldest licensee in the county. Maurice & Janet Cole took over in 1981 and looked after Alice Davies until she died aged 105. The Victorian public bar looks little different to when it was opened in 1880 with red and black quarry-tiled floor, open cast-iron fireplace, Victorian counter and bar back shelves held up by slender columns. Seating includes basic benches attached to a half-height panelled dado. The only change made by the Coles’ has been to cut a narrow opening in the dividing wall to the former kitchen and pantry in c.1981 to expand the public area and slightly extend the bar counter. The rear area also has a red and black quarry-tiled floor and an Aga cooker with tiled surround. Note the door with a number ‘3’ on it, which suggests it was a room used for storing alcohol (the numbering was a requirement of Customs and Excise for rooms for serving or storing alcohol). To the rear right is a further room, which has been brought into public use in recent years. It has an early 20th-century tiled and cast-iron fireplace and glass-fronted display cabinet. Gents’ accessed via passageway - the original outside gents' are still there!

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