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Kings Arms

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Greater London West - Hanwell

One star - A pub interior of special national historic interest

Listed Status: Not listed

110 Uxbridge Road
Hanwell
W7 3SU

Tel: (020) 8840 6099

Website https://thekingsarmshanwell.co.uk/

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Drayton Green

Station Distance: 950m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Hanwell) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

Rebuilt in 1930 and, despite major alterations in early 2017, the sense of the original layout along with a good deal of the fittings survives.

Each of the external doors led to separate rooms, with that in the centre accessing a former small private bar whose position can be discerned by the floorboards set at right-angles to the prevailing pattern. The partitions creating this bar were removed in 2017, when the publican's office at the back of the servery was also lost, and the colour tone of the pub drastically altered with the brown woodwork being painted olive green on the panelling and turquoise on the counters. In the original arrangements, to the left was the public bar, behind which was a further room, but this is now occupied by a kitchen. To the right were two other rooms, divided by a surviving wooden partition, but the double doors between them have also been lost.

Most of the extensive 1930s panelling survives and you can spot the difference between the erstwhile public bar on the left which has simple vertical panelling, and the 'better' right hand bar which has fielded panelling. The treatment of the counter front, and the 1930s tiling at the foot of the counter is similarly differentiated. The room at the back right also has fielded panelling to two-thirds height on the walls, as well as a bar counter also with fielded panelling, and some attractive glazing in the window on the right and to the former publican's office behind the servery.

Rebuilt in 1930 by Mann, Crossman & Paulin, and, despite major alterations in early 2017, the sense of the original layout along with a good deal of the fittings survives. Each of the external doors led to separate rooms, with that in the centre accessing a former small private bar whose position can be seen inside in terms of floorboards set at right-angles to the prevailing pattern. In the original arrangements, to the left was the public bar, behind which was a further room, but this is now occupied by a kitchen (with a gaping opening). To the right were two other rooms, divided by a surviving wooden partition: there were double doors between the two but these have long gone.

Most of the extensive 1930s panelling survives and you can spot the diference between the left and right sides. The left-hand bar area was originally the public bar and has simple vertical panelling. The right-hand part was the 'better' side of the pub and has fielded panelling. The treatment of the counter front is similarly differentiated. Note the 1930s tiling at the foot of the counter (again different treatment between left and right).

The 2017 changes changed the colour tone of the place with the brown woodwork being changed to olive green on the panelling and turquoise on the counters. 2017 also saw the loss of a publican's office at the back of the servery and the refitting of the toilets.
 

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