Kenilworth

Edinburgh & The Lothians - Edinburgh

A historic pub interior of national importance

Listed Status: A

152 Rose Street
Edinburgh
EH2 3JD

Tel: (0131) 226 1773

Email: kenilworth@nicholsonspubs.com

Website http://www.nicholsonspubs.co.uk/thekenilworthrosestreetedinburgh

Real Ale: Yes

Real Cider: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

The building originated about 1780 while the interior, by architect Thomas Purves Marwick, dates from 1899 for Peter Fisher, whose family were wine and spirit merchants. It was given a careful restoration for Alloa Brewery in 1966 by architects Covell Matthews. It is one of four impressive pubs in Edinburgh with an island bar (cf. Abbotsford nearby). The island gantry is a fine piece of pub furnishing. The walls are covered in blue and white Minton tiles, topped off with rows of brown and cream tiles, finishing some two-thirds up the double-height public bar, which has a patterned plasterwork ceiling in turquoise and cream. There is a massive mirror advertising Dryborough’s ales of Edinburgh, made by Forrest & Son of Glasgow who were major suppliers of such mirrors. The pot-shelf and short partitioning attached to the bar are 1966 additions, which is also the date of the Scott Room, a small room added down a new passage to the rear. Note the Art Nouveau-style stained glass windows on the front and side in the first-floor area. Listing upgraded to A in 2008 as a result of survey work by CAMRA.

One of Edinburgh’s four impressive 'single-room-with-island-bar' pubs. The walls are covered in blue and white Minton tiles, topped-off with rows of brown and white tiles finishing some two-thirds up the double-height public bar, which has a patterned plasterwork ceiling in red and cream. Built c.1780, the interior, by architect Thomas Purves Marwick, dates from 1899 and was subject to a very costly renovation by Alloa Brewery in 1966 using architects Covell Matthews. They restored the splendid mahogany island bar to its original position and renovated the decoratively carved front with its brass match-strikers under the rim; unfortunately, part of the right-hand side was lost in changes prior to 1966.

Even the damaged tiles were restored using majolica and it is difficult to distinguish them from the original Victorian ones. The original tiles have a smooth finish and much of the crazing (crack-like markings on the tiles due to ageing) is more like scratches; where the tiles have a relief/rough finish and the crazing forms a pattern the tiles are the restored/replacement ones. There is a massive Dryborough's of Edinburgh mirror. The short partitioning attached to the bar, and the pot-shelf are 1966 additions, which is the date the Scott Room, a small lounge / family room, was added down a new passage to the rear. Note the stained glass windows on the front and side in the first-floor area. Listing upgraded to A in 2008 as a result of survey work by CAMRA.

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