Coal Hole

Greater London Central - London

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: II

91-92 Strand
London, Strand
WC2R 0DW

Tel: (020) 7379 9883

Email: coalhole@nicholsonspubs.com

Website http://www.nicholsonspubs.co.uk/restaurants/london/thecoalholestrandlondon

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: London Charing Cross

Station Distance: 400m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (London Charing Cross) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

A stunning piece of ‘olde English’ revival as employed, rather later, at the even more stunning Cittie of Yorke. The pub is part of the Savoy Court complex built in 1903-4 to designs by a well-known Edwardian architect T E Collcutt. Expense was not spared in creating a lofty, beamed L-shaped drinking hall whose main decorative theme is the celebration of the fruit of the vine. In a massive, deep frieze there are decorative young ladies collecting grapes in an agreeable state of undress. Do go upstairs to the mezzanine floor from where you can get a bird’s eye view of this spectacular pub and its sumptuous features. The pub claims to take its name from being a popular hostelry for London coal heavers who used to fuel the city before the arrival of natural gas. There is also a small, windowless snug in the basement which purports to be the pub’s coal hole.

A stunning piece of ‘olde English’ revival as employed, rather later, at the even more stunning Cittie of Yorke. The pub is part of the Savoy Court complex built in 1903-4 to designs by a well-known Edwardian architect T E Collcutt. Expense was not spared in creating a lofty, beamed L-shaped drinking hall whose main decorative theme is the celebration of the fruit of the vine. In a massive, deep frieze there are decorative young ladies collecting grapes in an agreeable state of undress. At the rear of the pub is an exuberant terracotta fireplace decorated with juicy bunches of grapes and an escutcheon with the uplifting motto ‘convivium moderatum atque honestum’ (loosely translated as an exhortation to honesty and what we now refer to as ‘responsible drinking’). The bar-back with its flat-arched openings and simply panelled counter is original though the obtrusive gantries stuck on the corners are an unpleasant modern addition.

Do go upstairs to the mezzanine floor from where you can get a bird’s eye view of this spectacular pub and its sumptuous features. The pub claims to take its name from being a popular hostelry for London coal heavers who used to fuel the city before the arrival of natural gas. There is also a small, windowless snug in the basement which purports to be the pub’s coal hole.

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