Country House

Greater London South West - Earlsfield

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

2-4 Groton Road
Earlsfield
SW18 4EP

Tel: (020) 8870 3204

Email: 030921@bermondseypubco.com

Website https://www.thecountryhouseearlsfield.co.uk

Real Ale: Yes

Nearby Station: Earlsfield

Station Distance: 200m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Earlsfield) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

This street-corner local was built near Earlsfield station in Victorian times as the Country House. ‘The Fog’ was a nickname (from the days when London had fogs/smogs) bestowed by those who tarried here on the way home to their nearest and dearest and attributed their tardy return to being delayed by the fog. The pub was given a total refit about 1930 and still retains its three separate rooms, each of which bears striking brass plates with the name in question – public bar (on the corner), private bar, and – perhaps unique – meal room. The fittings are plain but elegant with half-height wall panelling, simple bar counter and black and white tiling in front of it. There are exposed beams, typical of c.1930, to the ceilings. There is a dumb waiter in the private bar, sliding doors from the meal room to the public bar, and a hatch to the servery. Note also the three surviving gaslight fittings.

Tucked away street-corner local with a brown glazed brick exterior was built near Earlsfield station in Victorian times. 'The Fog’ was a nickname (from the days when London had fogs/smogs) bestowed by those who tarried here on the way home to their nearest and dearest and attributed their tardy return to being delayed by the fog. The pub was given a total refit about 1930 and still retains its three separate rooms, each of which bears striking brass plates with the name in question – public bar (on the corner), private bar, and – perhaps unique – meal room. The fittings are plain but elegant and there are exposed beams, typical of c.1930, to the ceilings.

The public bar on the corner has a bare wood floor, 1930s panelled curved counter with a black and white trough around the base and 1930s top. The bar back fitting also dates from the 1930s with leaded mirrors and only one fridge has replaced some lower shelves, another fridge is sensibly under the counter. There is a dado of fielded panelling around the room, a 1930s brick painted green wood surround fireplace with a modern hearth, and some etched and frosted windows remain. Note the cupboards in the bar counter and there are the three surviving gaslight fittings.

A widish gap (sliding doors removed) leads to the pool room (originally the meal room) on the right which has a bare wood floor with more fielded panelling on the dado. Service is via a small counter to the side of the servery also with a black and white trough around the base and a Tudor arch shaped window above the hatch opening which may have had a rising window in the past? It retains a 1930s wood surround fireplace but it is blocked-up.

The lounge on the left (originally the private bar) has a carpet, 1930s panelled bar counter with original top and the 1930s four-bay Tudor arch shaped bar back fitting with leaded mirrors. There are two 1930s wood surround fireplaces but they have radiators in front of them. 1930s fielded panelling on the dado around two sides of the room but a more plainer modern dado on the front and left hand walls. There is a dumb waiter in the private bar.

Read More