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Beaconsfield

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Greater London North - Finsbury Park

Two star - A pub interior of very special national historic interest

Listed Status: Not listed

357 Green Lanes
Finsbury Park
N4 1DZ

Tel: (020) 8826 5200

Email: bookings@beaconsfieldhotel.com

Website http://www.beaconsfieldhotel.com/

Real Ale: Yes

Nearby Station: Harringay

Station Distance: 500m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Harringay)

View on: Whatpub

A good amount of the late 19th century refitting remains, including the central servery and stillion in its centre

Although opened out, The Beaconsfield still retains some Victorian work. Built in 1886-7 to the designs of the less well known architects Alexander and Gibbon who drew upon 17th-century details for inspiration. In 1897 the internal arrangements were changed when the present island servery was installed surrounded by a series of compartments. Various changes were made over the years that served to open up the pub, but the present single space we see today finally came about as late as in 1981 when Courage (Eastern) Brewery removed the final divisions thus consigning the compartments to history.

The most striking of the remaining Victorian work is the spacious servery, with its stillion in the middle, and bar counter with rectangular panelled front interspersed with wavy wooden pilasters, and linoleum inlaid top. Other surviving Victorian features are the Lincrusta-style decorated ceiling (now painted black), six cast-iron columns, curved lobby entrance on the corner, a considerable amount of etched mirrorwork towards the rear and in the games area at the back, and some stained glass in the upper portions of most windows.

A down-to-earth pub, which, although opened out, still retains a remarkable amount of Victorian work. Its changes over the years have been carefully documented and a history at the pub enables us to follow its evolution. The Beaconsfield was built in 1886-7 to the designs of the obscure architects Alexander and Gibbon who drew upon 17th-century details for inspiration. After the arrival of the third licensee in 1897 the internal arrangements were changed with the installation of the present island servery which was surrounded by a series of compartments.

The plan was drawn up by John E Pinder. One partition was removed in 1904 by F J Eedle & Meyers, minor alterations were made in 1934 and further partitions were removed in 1953. The single space we have today was the work of Courage (Eastern) Breweries’ chief architect, Mr Longstaff, in 1981 when the last remaining divisions were removed. The Victorian work remaining consists of the spacious servery (with its stillion in the middle), the richly decorated ceiling, six cast-iron columns, curved lobby entrance on the corner, a considerable amount of etched mirrorwork towards the rear and some stained glass.

Full Description