Palm Tree

Greater London East - Bow

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: II

127 Grove Road
Bow
E3 5RP

Tel: (020) 8980 2918

Real Ale: Yes

Real Cider: Yes

Nearby Station: Bethnal Green (National Rail)

Station Distance: 1450m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Bethnal Green (National Rail)) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

Rebuilt by Truman’s in 1929 when they purchased the cottage next door – hence the numbers ’24-6’ in relief on the fascia. With the surrounding housing vanished, thanks first to Hitler and then the even more energetic post-war planners, it looks strangely adrift in a green area beside the Regent’s Canal. The exterior has buff and mottled grey-blue ceramic work and also displays Truman’s proud eagle. Inside there are still two completely separate rooms. The corner one was originally further subdivided into two small bars and an off sales – note the three doors. It has a particularly attractive sweeping hemispherical end to the bar counter like a Scottish island bar particularly as there is a delicate ‘gantry’ in the centre, which was sadly shortened in 1977. At the rear is the original wood surround fireplace.

Rebuilt by Truman’s in 1929 when they purchased the cottage next door – hence the numbers ’24-6’ in relief on the fascia. With the surrounding housing vanished, thanks first to Hitler and then the even more energetic post-war planners, it looks strangely adrift in a green area beside the Regent’s Canal. The exterior has buff and mottled grey-blue ceramic work and also displays Truman’s proud eagle. Inside there are still two completely separate rooms. The corner one was originally further subdivided into two small bars and an off sales – note the three doors. It has a particularly attractive sweeping hemispherical end to the bar counter like a Scottish island bar particularly as there is a delicate ‘gantry’ in the centre, which was sadly shortened in 1977. At the rear is the original wood surround fireplace.

The right hand room, which is only open in the evenings, was intended to be the smarter area of the pub as can be seen by the rather finer detailing of both the dado and the curved counter (panelled as opposed to upright tongue-and-grooved work). Both counters have before them the typical Truman’s tiled chequerwork and both also have openings for access to the beer engines. On the right-hand side it looks as though the cover over the East London Fives dart board might be a survivor from the 1930s. There is another original wood surround fireplace with a gas fire in front, a shallow vestibule but the skylight has been covered over and the pot shelf is modern. The loose furniture is worth a look for some attractive benches on the right-hand side and the 1930s tables in both bars. Those in the corner bar have unusual cork tops, as does the counter on the right-hand side.

Until 1977 there was an office behind the bar where originally bar staff would take the customers money and receive change. It was situated where there are three modern sections of bar back fitting on the left (right two sections are original) – part of the cut glass has been preserved in a frame over the right hand side fireplace. The pub’s loos on the right side are intact with dados of cream and some brown tiling, red tiled floor and original fittings. As there was no ladies’ toilet on the bar side one was added in 1977 by making the gents’ smaller.

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