Northcote Arms

Greater London East - Leyton

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status:

110 Grove Green Rd
Leyton
E11 4EL

Tel: (020) 8518 7516

Email: tuesday.northcotee11@yahoo.com

Website https://thenorthcotee11.com/

Real Ale: Yes

Nearby Station: Stratford International

Station Distance: 1800m

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

Two-storey late Victorian building probably built by Saville Brothers brewery of Stratford, who were taken over by Charringtons in 1925. The public bar is on the corner, with the saloon bar on the right reached via an original floor-to-ceiling screen. The screen has three large stained glass glazed panels above the doorway and panelling, each with separate panels mainly of a floral theme and the small birds that were much loved by the Victorians. A delightful small baffle sits on the bar counter side of the screen, also with a floral theme and a small bird (blue tit).

The bar counter in these rooms looks Victorian, with square panels in the various sections, and three iron columns with ornate capitals survive. Walls all have matchboard wood panelling on the dado, and the graceful stairway with spindled handrail leading up from the saloon bar has a large floor to ceiling glazed panel at the bottom facing it. Original stained glass panels survive in the upper portions of the outer windows, and these are very similar in design to those in the screen.

Two-storey building with attics built of red brick and stone. The four gable ends have pairs of carved mermaids and there is brown tiling on the ground floor dado. The first recorded licensee is in 1896 when the pub was probably newly built by Saville Brothers brewery of Stratford, who were taken over by Charringtons in 1925.

An off licence was located on the left hand side of the pub on the Francis Road elevation; this was in use until the mid 1970s but is now subsumed into pub use. The public bar is on the corner, with the saloon bar on the right reached via an original floor-to-ceiling screen. The screen is mainly matchboard panelled, has a doorway, with a door still in place, with three large stained glass glazed panels above, each containing five separate panels mainly of a floral theme, with the central rectangular ones featuring small birds at their centre. There is also a delightful small baffle on the bar counter side of the screen with four small glazed panels featuring floral designs, and again a small bird.

The bar counter in these rooms is old, possibly Victorian, with square panels in the various sections throughout. The upper parts of the central fitment (or waggon) in the centre of the servery look quite modern, although the woodwork forming the base looks older, if not original. Three iron columns with ornate capitals. survive, Walls all have matchboard wood panelling on the dado, and the graceful stairway with spindled handrail leading up from the saloon bar has a large floor to ceiling glazed panel at the bottom facing it. There is a further room at the back on the right, reached from the saloon bar via a very wide wood-framed arch. The bar counter in here looks more modern than that in the other rooms. All the original wooden panelling, plus the columns, are unfortunately painted a light grey.

Original stained glass panels survive in the upper portions of the outer windows; these are very similar in style to those in the screen, having mainly floral-themed small panels, again with small birds in the roundels of the central rectangular panels.

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