Horse & Groom

Nottinghamshire - Linby

A historic pub interior of some regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

12A Main Street
Linby
NG15 8AE

Tel: (0115) 963 3334

Email: enquiries@thehorseandgroom-linby.co.uk

Website http://thehorseandgroom-linby.co.uk

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

UPDATE 2017.

Star / Heineken have carried out a thorough refurbishment that has seen significant changes.


On the right-hand side where there was a back-to-back fireplace an enormous hole has been knocked-through here, and a wood-burning stove now stands in this space. The small bar-servery in the front room (this was relatively modern) has been removed, replaced by painted panelling. To give access from the front room to a counter, a wide doorway has been knocked-through between the two rooms. Although panelling has been retained in the front room, the inevitable ‘gastro’ grey-green paint has been applied. So the character of the right-hand side of the pub is ruined. Just about the only decent survival is the small snug on the left-centre.

Please note - the photos are therefore out of date and the description below is one written before the recent changes.

An old (possibly 17th-century) pub extended by Home Brewery in the 1920s and again in 1937 - the multi-room layout dates from those last alterations. Entering the lobby, you originally faced the off-sales but this has now been absorbed into the right-hand lounge. That room still has its 1930s panelling and wood surround to the fireplace but the bar counter is 1960s work and the bar back even newer. Back in the lobby, the left-hand door takes you into a parquet-floored passage with panelled walls; it is separated from a small snug by a rare part-glazed partition wall. The snug has much from the 1930s - the counter, fireplace, wall panelling and some of the bar back. The left-hand lounge has seen a good deal of refurbishment with only the parquet floor surviving from 1937. Another passageway leads from the lounge back door to the original entrance door. The larger bar-lounge, rear right, was added in 1937 and has a large inglenook fireplace, original slatted benches and bar counter plus a bar back mixing old with new.

UPDATE 2017.

Star / Heineken have carried out a thorough refurbishment that has seen significant changes.


On the right-hand side where there was a back-to-back fireplace an enormous hole has been knocked-through here, and a wood-burning stove now stands in this space. The small bar-servery in the front room (this was relatively modern) has been removed, replaced by painted panelling. To give access from the front room to a counter, a wide doorway has been knocked-through between the two rooms. Although panelling has been retained in the front room, the inevitable ‘gastro’ grey-green paint has been applied. So the character of the right-hand side of the pub is ruined. Just about the only decent survival is the small snug on the left-centre.

Please note - the photos are therefore out of date and the description below is one written before the recent changes.

The structure of the building is old, possibly 17th C. witnessed by the thick stone walls. Major rebuilding was carried out by Home Brewery in the 1920s and 1937: this included raising the height of the building - as can be seen on the west gable wall. Superb unspoilt village pub, with its multi-roomed layout of 1937 intact and it retains a lot of 1930s features. The central front entrance to lobby leads to small rooms to the left and right. The smoke room on the right retains its 1930s panelling to picture-frame height and the fireplace has a 1930s wood surround but a 1960s stone interior. A door from the right hand side lobby was blocked up in the 1960s and new fixed seating installed. The bar counter could be from the 1960s but the bar back looks modern.

The left door leads to a parquet floored passage with 1930s panelled walls. A rare part-glazed partition wall separates the passage from a small snug, which retains its 1930s counter and stone & brick fireplace. The walls are covered with more 1930s panelling and the bar back is a mixture of old and new work. The small left hand lounge has been subject to much refurbishment (new dado panelling and fireplace) with only the parquet floor remaining from the 1930s. The bar counter could be 1960s work with its copper top and the bar back has a mixture of old and new work. A parquet-floored passageway leads from the rear door of the lounge to the original external door. The former off-sales was situated here with service from a hatch in the main bar area. A 'lean-to' and toilets at the rear were added in 1970 and enables you to walk all around the pub; the original outside toilets are now a coal shed.

The larger bar-lounge rear-right was added in 1937 and has a large inglenook brick fireplace with a decorative ceramic strip at mantelshelf level and original slotted benches. The bar counter here looks like the original 1930s one but the bar back is a mixture of old and new work. The rear single-storey Paddock Room, originally part of the stable block, was converted in the late 1960s early 1970s to become a cocktail bar and is now a popular dining/function room that can hold 50 people. Also, in the first part of the 20th century the pub brewed its own beer from the old stable block.

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