Nova Scotia

Gloucestershire & Bristol - Bristol

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: II

1 Nova Scotia Place
Bristol, Hotwells
BS1 6XJ

Tel: 07794 781189

Email: info@novascotiabristol.co.uk

Website http://www.novascotiabristol.co.uk/

Real Ale: Yes

Real Cider: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Parson Street

Station Distance: 1800m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Parson Street)

View on: Whatpub

A late-19th-century pub converted from a row of three terraced houses. It retains its mahogany bar-back fitting with a door to an office in the middle – imaginative legend says it was made for a ship but didn’t fit so was installed here instead. However, the remarkable survivor here is the Victorian low screen, attached to the ceiling with an iron stay, situated to the right of the public bar. This creates the small snug known as the Captain’s Cabin with etched glass stating that in previous times it was a ‘Private Bar’. Old bench seating is attached to panelled walls throughout the pub. The area on the left was once a separate room.

Early 19th century row of three terraced house converted into a pub in the late 19th century.

It still retains its splendid original mahogany bar back in two sections - a large one on the left, small one on the right with a door to an office between them. Note the slender rounded edge mirrored panels running across the top and down the edges. The back fitting has a maker's label hidden behind the clock, 'Parnall's', a firm that fitted out boats. Legend has it that the bar back was made for a ship (liner?) but it didn't fit and was installed here instead!

Also retains its original bar counter with decorative brackets, all from the late Victorian times. The remarkable survivor here is the Victorian low screen which is attached to the ceiling with an iron stay situated to the right of the public bar. It creates the small snug known as the Captain's Cabin with its 'Private Bar' etched and frosted panels, which also appears in the twin entrance doors. One of the 4 panels is a transfer - can you work out which one?

Possibly before the 1920s there was no counter in the private bar as the small curved one is different in style to the main bar counter. There is bench seating attached to a dado of tongue and groove panelling throughout the pub - some, notably in the public bar and on the back wall, may date from the 1920s rather than Victorian times. On the far left is a small area that would have been a separate room in the past. Note the wooden shutters on the exterior windows.

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