Hope & Anchor

Greater London West - Hammersmith

A historic pub interior of national importance

This pub is currently closed (since 17/07/2012)

UPDATE 2016: Closed July 2012 and become a private residence on the upper floors. As of January 2015 the Council stated that officers would be keeping an eye on the building to make sure that a lawful change of use to a single dwelling house does not occur by default through any residential occupation of the ground floor for a period of four years or more.

Permission to convert to residential with proviso that ground floor remains intact. MC Feb 2016

Listed Status: II

20 Macbeth Street
Hammersmith
W6 9JJ

Tel: None

Nearby Station: Kensington (Olympia)

Station Distance: 1600m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Kensington (Olympia))

View on: Whatpub

UPDATE 2020.

Still closed. An application for a lawful development certificate for residential use was refused in 2017 and dismissed at appeal in early 2018.


UPDATE 2016: Closed July 2012 and become a private residence on the upper floors. As of January 2015 the Council stated that officers would be keeping an eye on the building to make sure that a lawful change of use to a single dwelling house does not occur by default through any residential occupation of the ground floor for a period of four years or more.

Description before it closed.


This drinkers’ local is a good example of a largely unaltered, modest Truman’s pub of about 1930. Planned as part of a housing development, it retains its separate public bar and saloon. The former is the larger but in terms of fittings there is little to differentiate them. Both have wall panelling and fixed seats and the counters are the same plain, panelled design while both bar-backs each have an Art Deco clock. Many pubs had spittoon troughs in front of bar counters and that in the saloon bar here is an excellent example. This trough has timber edging and is lined with brown and white chequered tiles. There’s even a small opening at the counter corner to sweep the bits and pieces together.

UPDATE 2020.

Still closed. An application for a lawful development certificate for residential use was refused in 2017 and dismissed at appeal in early 2018.


UPDATE 2016: Closed July 2012 and become a private residence on the upper floors. As of January 2015 the Council stated that officers would be keeping an eye on the building to make sure that a lawful change of use to a single dwelling house does not occur by default through any residential occupation of the ground floor for a period of four years or more.

Description before it closed.


This drinkers’ local is a good example of a largely unaltered, modest Truman’s pub of about 1930. Planned as part of a housing development, it retains its separate public bar and saloon. The former is the larger but in terms of fittings there is little to differentiate them. Both have wall panelling and fixed seats and the counters are the same plain, panelled design while both bar-backs each have an Art Deco clock. Many pubs had spittoon troughs in front of bar counters and that in the saloon bar here is an excellent example. This trough has timber edging and is lined with brown and white chequered tiles. There’s even a small opening at the counter corner to sweep the bits and pieces together.

Other original features are the brick fireplaces and, in the saloon, typical Truman’s lettering on the panelling advertising their wares. There is original tiling in the saloon bar. The one big change is the loss of the off-sales compartment – traceable in the closed doorway on the (puzzlingly named) Riverside Gardens side and the stopped-off spittoon trough. There is a pleasant garden area beyond a loggia outside the saloon.

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