Crown & Anchor

Mid Wales - Llanidloes

A historic pub interior of national importance

Ruby had a fall over Christmas 2016, and unfortunately broke her hip. She is recovering well, but her son has decided to put the pub up to lease. New licencees, 2017.

Listed Status: II

41 Long Bridge Street
Llanidloes
SY18 6EF

Tel: (01686) 412398

Website https://crown-anchor-inn-pub.business.site

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/crownandanchor.wales

Real Ale: Yes

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

An unspoilt small-town pub in the hands of the same family for over 100 years. It consists of five simply appointed rooms either side of a panelled corridor. The room at the front right was a haberdashery shop until around 1948. The tiny snug on the middle right is the original public bar and retains a (probably) Victorian counter and shelving behind: it has a glazed screen to the corridor and it is this screening which is the defining characteristic of the pub. In this room an old mirror advertises ‘Ind Coope Burton Ales’. Another old mirror, for ‘Truman’s Burton Ales’, survives in the rear right-hand room. A more modern mirror, in the front right-hand bar, celebrates Ruby Holmes’ fifty years in charge (1965-2017).

UPDATE 2018:

Following the Landlady (Ruby Holmes) suffering a fall over Christmas 2016 her son decided to put the pub up for lease. New licencees, 2017.


This 17th-century unspoilt town pub consists of five small rooms, one of which was a haberdashery shop until c.1948. In the same family for over 100 years with licensee Ruby Holmes running it from 1965 to 2017. A corridor with half-height panelling divides the two sides of the pub. The tiny snug on the middle right is the original public bar and retains a c.100 year old bar counter (the top was replaced in the 1980s), old bar back shelving with a mirrored backing, and basic bench seating attached to the partition wall. Note the old cemented-on lettering on the glazed screen around the snug. There is a fine mirror advertising 'Ind Coope Burton Ales'. The ribbed hardboard dado panelling was probably added in the 1950s. Note the ledge used as a seat when busy - however the locals now call it the 'Suicide Seat' following two customers who regularly sat there committing suicide later in their lives!

Note the old tiny hatch for service in the timber and glass screen around the rear right 'TV Room'. The screen on the passageway side still has a tiny window to let the smoke out (the room had a 1950s tiled fireplace until the 1970s) and old 'Truman's Burton Ales' mirror, but the panelling and seating in this room are modern. The rear left room with '2' on the hatch door still retains old panelling with simple bench seating attached. It also has a tiny sliding window in the glass and timber partition wall to let the smoke out and is home to a pool table. The front left small room has a distinctive 1950s tiled fireplace and modern fixed seating. The main bar has shelves on a ply-panelled wall added in 1948 but the present counter dates from the mid-1980s and the fireplace is modern.

Full Description