Kilburn Arms

Greater London North West - London

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

97-101 Willesden Lane
London, Kilburn
NW6 7SD

Tel: (020) 3561 5854

Email: kilburnarms@gmail.com

Website http://thekilburnarms.co.uk/

Real ale & Cider: Real Ale

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: West Hampstead

Station Distance: 1150m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (West Hampstead)

View on: Whatpub

Three-storey building of brick with balustrade: pediments on the left and right corners have plasterwork detail of the Fleur-de-Lys, and a central one has the wording ‘The Prince of Wales 1899’. To the left is an inter-war single storey extension also with a pediment having plasterwork including the bust of the Prince of Wales, (later King Edward VII). On the far left is what appears to have been a former shop, possibly an Off License, with Art Deco detail at the top.

The original pub part consists of two bars separated by a glazed partition with a large gap giving an open-plan feel. The right hand bar has an impressive vestibule entrance with cut and etched windows, a bare wood floor and old dado panelling. It has a curved bar counter with a front of a similar style to the panelling in the single-storey part of the building so presumably dates from the inter-war period. The four bay bar back fitting has good cut and etched glass panels with floral and fruit decoration with bay three being a door with a ‘Office’ cut and etched glass panel. Some lower shelving has been lost to fridges.

Three-storey building of brick with balustrade: pediments on the left and right corners have plasterwork detail of the Fleur-de-Lys, and a central one has the wording ‘The Prince of Wales 1899’. To the left is an inter-war single storey extension also with a pediment having plasterwork including the bust of the Prince of Wales, (later King Edward VII). On the far left is what appears to have been a former shop, possibly an Off License, with Art Deco detail at the top.

The original pub part consists of two bars separated by a glazed partition with a large gap giving an open-plan feel. The right hand bar has an impressive vestibule entrance with cut and etched windows, a bare wood floor and old dado panelling. It has a curved bar counter with a front of a similar style to the panelling in the single-storey part of the building so presumably dates from the inter-war period. The four bay bar back fitting has good cut and etched glass panels with floral and fruit decoration with bay three being a door with a ‘Office’ cut and etched glass panel. Some lower shelving has been lost to fridges.

The left bar has a bare wood floor, a vestibule entrance with some curved cut and etched windows featuring floral and fruit decoration and old dado panelling. It has a curved bar counter with a front of a similar style to the panelling in the single-storey part of the building and dates from the inter-war period. The five bay bar back fitting has good cut and etched glass panels with floral and fruit decoration and modest pilasters with capitals. The majority of lower shelving has been lost to fridges.

Opened-up to the left is a large room in the single storey part of the pub that might have been for functions (or billiards?) with its plain skylight. It has a good plasterwork cornice, a dado of fielded panelling with the wall above have just thin panels around areas of wallpaper. There is a brick fireplace painted black which might date to the inter-war period. The former shop on the far left is currently used for storage and also has a plain skylight.

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