Red Lion

Greater London West - Isleworth

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

92/94 Linkfield Road
Isleworth
TW7 6QJ

Tel: (020) 8560 1457

Real Ale: Yes

Nearby Station: Isleworth

Station Distance: 250m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Isleworth) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

Believed to have been built by T H Nowell Parr (it has many features seen in his other pubs for Fullers & Royal Brewery) in the early 1900s it retains many original fittings in three rooms. The exterior features arcading of six bays with a dado of dark green / brown glazed brick with green tiles (possibly Royal Doulton which were the choice of Nowell Parr) above, some in relief. There are two disused doors – one on the right was the off sales and the other presumably a private entrance. On the right twin doors with ‘Bottles’ and‘ Jugs’ (assumed to have been moved) lead to the public bar – a disused door into this room has ‘The Red Lion’ in the top light. Beyond the stud wall on the left is now a kitchen but there was an off-sales in this area originally.

Believed to have been built by T H Nowell Parr (it has many features seen in his other pubs for Fullers & Royal Brewery) in the early 1900s it retains many original fittings in three rooms. The exterior features arcading of six bays with a dado of dark green / brown glazed brick with green tiles (possibly Royal Doulton which were the choice of Nowell Parr) above, some in relief. There are two disused doors – one on the right was the off sales and the other presumably a private entrance. On the right twin doors with ‘Bottles’ and‘ Jugs’ (assumed to have been moved) lead to the public bar – a disused door into this room has ‘The Red Lion’ in the top light. Beyond the stud wall on the left is now a kitchen but there was an off-sales in this area originally.

The public bar has a bar counter that looks to be from the inter-war period with its inlaid red top whereas the bar back is much older consisting of two bays with leaded mirrored panels. Behind the servery is a publican’s office still in use, with a sliding door having an Edwardian etched panel in it. The fireplace has an inter-war wood surround but the interior tiles are modern; good loose benches (dated?) and old dado panelling. At the rear of the room is a pool table – it is not obvious if there were two rooms originally. Lots of colourful leaded lights in the exterior windows.

Left hand twin front doors with ‘Saloon & Billiards’ on the left one and ‘Public Bar’ on the right one (moved?) lead to the saloon bar with walls of fielded panelling, a bar counter that looks old but might have been moved back (?), and a two-bay bar back with leaded glass mirrored panels but fridges have replaced lower shelving. The fireplace is tiled with a Tudor-arch shaped hearth but not in use and a door at the rear left has a leaded panel in it (behind it is the cleaners cupboard now). The rear wall of the room has part cut out to improve supervision of the rear room.

A doorway from the saloon bar leads to the two-part rear room – on the left is a stage area where the wide opening looks to have always been so (again, something seen in Nowell Parr pubs). Bay window at rear has three colourful leaded windows. The right hand part is believed to have been the billiards room and has panelling on the walls to two-thirds height and a lino floor now covered by carpet. There are two bar counter openings – left section is curved and behind it is an old mirrored bar back fitting. Toilets at the rear were added in the inter-war years – they are modernised but do have Crittal windows. Still retains the original stables at the rear which have been used for beer festivals.

Read More