Henry Holland

Greater London Central - London

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

39 Duke Street
London, Marylebone
W1U 1LP

Tel: (020) 7629 4426

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Marylebone

Station Distance: 1200m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Marylebone) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

An unusually intact example of post-war pub-fitting. Rebuilt by Whitbread in 1958, this three-storey (plus attic) pub is named after a famous late Georgian architect (1745-1806). The neo-Georgian style, freely-treated classical doorway, sash windows and boot-scrapers all give a nod to the buildings of Holland’s time. There is one bar on the ground floor which is distinguished by virtually all-over bare wood panelling, giving it an elegant feel. Note the attractive interlinked marquetry band on the counter front and the sub-Adamesque plaster decoration on the ceiling. Panelling and plaster decoration reappear in the upstairs restaurant where the servery is a modern insertion. Unfortunately, so too is the bar back downstairs (the finish of the wood and the ornamental detail is rather different from the rest of the woodwork). The door to the stairs and the doors into the restaurant have glazing set in copper strips and the upstairs gents’ is lined with rather remarkable red and light grey veneer panels set in chrome strips (the ladies’ has been modernised).

An unusually intact example of post-war pub-fitting. Rebuilt by Whitbread in 1958, this three-storey (plus attic) pub is named after a famous late Georgian architect (1745-1806). The neo-Georgian style, freely-treated classical doorway, sash windows and boot-scrapers all give a nod to the buildings of Holland’s time. There is one bar on the ground floor which is distinguished by virtually all-over bare wood panelling, giving it an elegant feel. Note the attractive interlinked marquetry band on the counter front and the sub-Adamesque plaster decoration on the ceiling. Panelling and plaster decoration reappear in the upstairs restaurant where the servery is a modern insertion. Unfortunately, so too is the bar back downstairs (the finish of the wood and the ornamental detail is rather different from the rest of the woodwork). The door to the stairs and the doors into the restaurant have glazing set in copper strips and the upstairs gents’ is lined with rather remarkable red and light grey veneer panels set in chrome strips (the ladies’ has been modernised).

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