Cork & Bottle Hampstead

Greater London North West - Hampstead

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

154 Fleet Road
Hampstead
NW3 2QX

Tel: (020) 7267 6484

Email: hampstead@thecorkandbottle.co.uk

Website http://www.thecorkandbottle.co.uk/hampstead/

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Kentish Town

Station Distance: 1850m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Kentish Town) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

The star here is the striking geometric and floral, colourful patterned enamel-sectioned ceiling surrounded by a strip of mahogany and with ceiling bosses throughout – a similar example can be seen at the Cambridge, Leicester Square. There are no divisions on this to indicate the former room layout. There are two marble fireplaces which look to be original but one has a modern hearth.

A wedge-shaped pub rebuilt in 1904 which retains much of its original interior including an amazing ceiling. There are two vestibule entrances with some original etched and frosted glazed panels. To the sides of both entrances are areas of multi-coloured tiled floors. Originally the interior would have been divided into a number of bars separated by partitions but none of these survive so it is now a single room in a narrow V-shape with a curved end. In the centre is an island servery reflecting the shape of the pub; the counter is original with sloping front but has been painted grey and has a modern copper top all along it. In the middle is an exceptionally narrow carved mirrored bar gantry / bar-back fitting: this nearly reaches the ceiling and has a broken pediment, clock on the top, and lamp holders.

The star here is the striking geometric and floral, colourful patterned enamel-sectioned ceiling surrounded by a strip of mahogany and with ceiling bosses throughout – a similar example can be seen at the Cambridge, Leicester Square. There are no divisions on this to indicate the former room layout. There are two marble fireplaces which look to be original but one has a modern hearth. Formerly G.E. Aldwinkle’s, its literary customers included George Orwell, who worked at a bookshop opposite, and Joe Orton.

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