Churchill Arms

Greater London West - Kensington

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

119 Kensington Church Street
Kensington
W8 7LN

Tel: (020) 7727 4242

Email: churchillarms@fullers.co.uk

Website http://www.churchillarmskensington.co.uk/

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Shepherd's Bush

Station Distance: 1950m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Shepherd's Bush) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

A popular Fuller’s pub, which is often very busy as much of its clientele is attracted by the excellent Thai food. It was built in the Victorian era but given a complete internal refit between the wars. There would have been separate rooms, of course, at that time but all the partitions have gone leaving a U-shaped drinking area. But most of the rest of the c.1930 work survives. The windows are very attractive with their canted bays and charming stained glass details. Then there is the bar counter, most of which has panels with triple mouldings round it, though the smaller, right-hand counter is much plainer. This makes it clear that the bars must have been separated by a partition and, if you look closely, you can see in the window-sill a small piece of patching where the old screen stood. The walls are extensively panelled and there are a couple of pretty tiled fireplaces.

A popular Fuller’s pub, which is often very busy as much of its clientele is attracted by the excellent Thai food. It was built in the Victorian era but given a complete internal refit between the wars. There would have been separate rooms, of course, at that time but all the partitions have gone leaving a U-shaped drinking area. But most of the rest of the c.1930 work survives. The windows are very attractive with their canted bays and charming stained glass details. Then there is the bar counter, most of which has panels with triple mouldings round it, though the smaller, right-hand counter is much plainer. This makes it clear that the bars must have been separated by a partition and, if you look closely, you can see in the window-sill a small piece of patching where the old screen stood. The walls are extensively panelled and there are a couple of pretty tiled fireplaces.

There are also two sets of snob-screens mounted on the counter: what age they are is a moot point. When the present licensee came in the mid-1980s they formed a continuous run but it’s hard to believe such an intrusive feature would have been put in during the 1930s when people favoured unencumbered counters. It’s likely they were a later restoration.

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