(Little)Plough

South Yorkshire - Doncaster

A historic pub interior of national importance

Listed Status: Not listed

8 West Laith Gate
Doncaster
DN1 1SF

Tel: (01302) 738310

Email: nickmgriffin@hotmail.co.uk

Real Ale: Yes

Nearby Station: Doncaster

Station Distance: 150m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Doncaster) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

A couple of minutes walk from Doncaster railway station. Behind the buff faience frontage is a lovely, small two-room pub with a well preserved interior created under plans of 1934 (displayed in the corridor). It was remodelled by the Grimsby brewers Hewitt Brothers Ltd who were Doncaster’s biggest pub owners for many years. Their legacy here is a straightforward but pleasing design of front bar, back lounge and side corridor. Apart from the modern fireplaces in both rooms and missing side panels from the serving hatch to the lounge (called a ‘music room’ on the plans), there is little to detract from the pub’s authentic 1930s character. Leaded glasswork, wall-coverings and fittings typical of the period are much in evidence, including the fixed seating with bell-pushes in the lounge and the bar counter with its horizontal banding (but modern top) and which appears to have been built larger than shown on the plans.

The ‘Little Plough’ is an unassuming two-roomed pub near the railway station with a well-preserved interior created under plans of 1934 (on display in the corridor). This was a remodelling by the Grimsby brewers, Hewitt Brothers Ltd, who were Doncaster’s biggest pub owners for many years following their 1881 family takeover of the local Exchange Brewery. Their legacy here is a straightforward but pleasing little design of front bar, side corridor and back lounge (labelled 'music room' on the plans).

Apart from the modern fireplaces in both rooms and missing side panels from the serving 'hatch' to the lounge, there is little to detract from the pub’s authentic Thirties character. Leaded glasswork, wall-coverings and fittings typical of the period are much in evidence, including the fixed seating with bell-pushes in the lounge and the bar-counter with its horizontal banding. (The latter appears to have been built larger than shown on the plans). CAMRA sought statutory listing in 2009, but without success.

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