Star

Greater London South East - Plumstead

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: Not listed

158 Plumstead Common Road
Plumstead, Plumstead Common
SE18 2UL

Tel: (020) 8316 7141

Email: hello@thestar-se18.co.uk

Website https://www.thestar-se18.co.uk

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Plumstead

Station Distance: 1100m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Plumstead) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

A community local which is something of a puzzle. The pub looks for all the world like an inter-war rebuild yet in the bar furthest down the side road (Jago Close) you will find what appears to be a Victorian bar-back, complete with pretty, flowery mirror strips (note the unusual high-level cupboard in it). The bar counter looks as though it could be of similar vintage, as does the screen that splits the two bars fronting Jago Close. Anyway this is a very rare survival of a compartmentalised interior in this part of London. The existence of the screen – barely over head height – on the right-hand side is a great rarity and shows how many a street-corner pub would have once been divided up. The part with the mirrored bar-back was evidently once also divided – hence the two entrance doors and the change in counter design. The left-hand side has a single-storey saloon lounge with three-quarter-height panelling, a skylight and a couple of brick fire surrounds. Apart from our Victorian conundrum the fittings are interwar work and include attractive striped glazing in the bar-back and complete tiled schemes in the loos. Note the gas-light fittings – four on the right-hand side and two (with shades) in the saloon lounge.

A community local, which is something of a puzzle. The pub looks for all the world like an inter-war rebuild yet in the bar furthest down the side road (Jago Close) you will find what appears to be a Victorian bar-back, a bar counter looks as though it could be of similar vintage, and a screen that splits the two bars fronting Jago Close. This is a very rare survival of a compartmentalised interior in this part of London. The existence of the screen – barely over head height – on the right-hand side is a great rarity and shows how many a street-corner pub would have once been divided up. The rear bar was evidently once also divided – hence the two entrance doors and the change in counter design.

The left-hand side is a single-storey ‘saloon lounge’ (wording in black on a frosted panel in the left of the two inner doors) and has a vestibule entrance with a terrazzo floor and leaded panels, a parquet floor, three-quarter-height panelling all around the room, a plain skylight and a couple of brick fire surrounds – all from the inter-war period. The bar counter is an inter-war panelled one with a checkerboard apron around the base and Art Deco-style bar back has some attractive striped glazing. Both the gents’ and ladies’ toilets are unchanged with a dado of inter-war tiling, terrazzo floors and part glazed screens.

The front right ‘public bar’ (wording in black on a frosted panel in the two inner doors) has a vestibule entrance with a terrazzo floor and leaded panels at the top, a wood laminate floor, and a fireplace with an old wood surround but modern tiled interior. The bar counter is old but painted a grey-blue colour and a similar mirrored bar back.

A low partition, which appears to be Victorian and has a doorway, sadly all painted blue-grey, separates the public bar from the rear ‘Jago Bar’. This has a vestibule entrance with a terrazzo floor and leaded panels, a wood laminate floor, a fireplace with an Art Deco wood surround (painted a grey-blue colour) but modern tiled interior, an old panelled bar counter painted a blue-grey colour and another similar mirrored bar back on the left. However, despite the majority of fittings being inter-war there is what appears to be a Victorian bar-back, complete with four pretty, flowery narrow mirror strips (note the unusual high-level cupboard in it), four decoratively carved brackets and a door where the glazed panel has a star burst and the word ‘Inn”; the bar counter, which originally reached the rear wall until it was cut back in 2016 looks as though it could be of similar vintage.

Note the gas-light fittings – four on the right-hand side and two (with shades) in the saloon lounge. When Arsenal FC (originally Woolwich Arsenal) were playing on Plumstead Common the team used the upstairs room at the Star as changing rooms.

Please note the pub has recently changed hands and food is now served but the owners are Enterprise Inns, who have previously indicated that flats sound more attractive to them, so locals and visitors need to support this pub to help keep it open. Fortunately the pub has successfully been registered as an Asset of Community Value (ACV).

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