Washington

Greater London North West - London

A historic pub interior of national importance

Listed Status: II

50 Englands Lane
London, Belsize Park
NW3 4UE

Tel: (020) 7722 8842

Email: enquiry@thewashingtonhampstead.co.uk

Website https://www.thewashingtonhampstead.co.uk/

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Kentish Town

Station Distance: 1700m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Kentish Town) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

The Washington effortlessly combines a relaxed modern atmosphere for eating and drinking with historic surroundings and has varied real ales. It is a prominent corner-site pub built in about 1865 for a developer, Daniel Tidey. The dominant feature outside is the bold first-floor windows with their alternating segmented and triangular heads. The interior, although much pulled around in modern times, still retains a great deal of interesting Victorian work.

The Washington effortlessly combines a relaxed modern atmosphere for eating and drinking with historic surroundings and has varied real ales. It is a prominent corner-site pub built in about 1865 for a developer, Daniel Tidey. The dominant feature outside is the bold first-floor windows with their alternating segmented and triangular heads. The interior, although much pulled around in modern times, still retains a great deal of interesting Victorian work, probably from a refitting in around 1890.

The building was a pub-cum-hotel and the lobby off Belsize Park Gardens has a floor mosaic proclaiming ‘Washington Hotel’ with the added temptation of ‘Billiards’ (ornamental door glass advertises ‘hotel lounge’ and ‘hotel bar’). The first American president’s bust appears in tiling above in a curious juxtaposition with some languid classical ladies. The name ‘W Holman’ here no doubt identifies the proprietor who redeveloped the place. There are lots of remnants of screenwork including three bays of a full-height timber and glass partition.

At the back are a series of the kind of back-painted mirrors depicting flora and fauna (two large mirrors on left feature herons, followed by a square mirror depicting general flora, then five to the right featuring songbirds and flora of different types) which seem to have been popular with late-Victorian pub owners. But the most extraordinary thing at the Washington is the high screen set above and forward from one side of the servery which is placed in the middle of the pub, in the centre of which is what would undoubtedly have been a waiter's position and is now an opening for staff. It has glazing in its top parts and parts of the arcading survive.

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