Scottish Stores

Greater London North - London

A historic pub interior of regional importance

Listed Status: II

2-4 Caledonian Road
London, King's Cross
N1 9DU

Tel: (020) 3384 6497

Email: info@thescottishstores.co.uk

Website http://www.thescottishstores.co.uk/

Real Ale: Yes

Real Cider: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: King's Cross

Station Distance: 250m

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (King's Cross) and Bus Stop

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

Five-storey building designed in 1900-1 by architects Wylson and Long, probably for James Kirk. The interior is of a central servery surrounded by three distinct areas created by two screens with doorways in them - one screen runs back from the street front and has etched glass panels – the other screen is parallel to the street incorporating the bar back with shallow double-curved arches.The woodwork in the servery has a curious mixture of Gothic and Jacobean detailing.

The front bar has fielded panelling to two-thirds height, the front bar counter has some new wood and the lower shelves have been replaced by fridges. Note the figure ‘2’ to the side of the middle double (disused) doors. Right hand bar has fielded panelling to two-thirds height with a set of coloured lithographs of hunting scenes by Cecil Aldin of 1900, set into frames in the panelling. High up over the bar-back there is a cartouche inscribed 'THE SCOTTISH STORES 1901' and the curved bar counter has cupboards. There is a figure ‘1’ on the inside of the right hand (disused) door. In the rear area is a staircase with and newel post with Jacobean detailing and an octagonal finial of Arts and Crafts character. A doorway in the screen leads back to the front bar.

Five-storey building designed in 1900-1 by architects Wylson and Long, probably for James Kirk. The interior is of a central servery surrounded by three distinct areas created by two screens with doorways in them - one screen runs back from the street front and has etched glass panels – the other screen is parallel to the street incorporating the bar back with shallow double-curved arches.The woodwork in the servery has a curious mixture of Gothic and Jacobean detailing.

The front bar has fielded panelling to two-thirds height, the front bar counter has some new wood and the lower shelves have been replaced by fridges. Note the figure ‘2’ to the side of the middle double (disused) doors. Right hand bar has fielded panelling to two-thirds height with a set of coloured lithographs of hunting scenes by Cecil Aldin of 1900, set into frames in the panelling. High up over the bar-back there is a cartouche inscribed 'THE SCOTTISH STORES 1901' and the curved bar counter has cupboards. There is a figure ‘1’ on the inside of the right hand (disused) door. In the rear area is a staircase with and newel post with Jacobean detailing and an octagonal finial of Arts and Crafts character. A doorway in the screen leads back to the front bar.

In front of the left and right entrances the remnants of ‘The Scottish Stores’ mosaics have recently been covered over by modern tiling (they say with the agreement of Historic England).

The pub was extended into the adjacent property on the left hand side facing the pub in 2016. The connection is through narrow doorway and has had no effect on the ambiance of the original building.

Read More