Princess of Wales

Greater London South East - Blackheath

A historic pub interior of some regional importance

Listed Status:

1a Montpelier Row
Blackheath
SE3 0RL

Tel: (020) 8852 5784

Email: enquiry@princessofwalespub.co.uk

Website https://www.princessofwalespub.co.uk/

Real Ale: Yes

Lunchtime Meals: Yes

Evening Meals: Yes

Nearby Station: Blackheath

Station Distance: 450m

Bus: Yes

View on: Whatpub

Three-storey stone-built pub was rebuilt in c.1865 by the Cator Blackheath Estates. This pub boasts a magnificent bar back on the left-hand bar which is dated c.1865 and therefore one of the oldest surviving bar-backs in the country, comprising two bays full height to the ceiling with two twisted barley columns in black and gold either side of each bay topped with capitols in gold. On the right-hand corner is a square projection with more of the original fascia and wording ‘Liquers’ and ‘Cigars’. A long bar to the rear on the right-hand side has a different style of bar back with the longer right-hand section having a plaster or moulded frieze at the top.

The pub is named after Caroline of Brunswick, Princess of Wales from 1795 to 1820, Consort to George IV who lived in Greenwich. This Three-storey stone-built pub was rebuilt in c.1865 by the Cator Blackheath Estates, who leased it to the City of London Brewery in 1888; it subsequently became a Hoare & Co, Charringtons and now Mitchells & Butlers pub.

The reason for the pub’s inclusion here is the showy and splendid bar back on the left-hand bar which is dated c.1865 and therefore one of the oldest surviving bar-backs in the country. This comprises 2 bays full height to the ceiling with two twisted barley columns in black and gold either side of each bay topped with capitols in gold with a facia running the full length of the bar back with inscriptions advertising spirits and wines in gold lettering ‘Champagne Brandy’, 'Old Tom' (with a clock between the words) and ‘Irish Whiskies’. Each bay has plain mirror backs with glass shelving which look to be modern. The lower part has been lost to cooling cabinets.

On the right hand-side a 3rd bay is an entrance to an old kitchen and on the right-hand corner is a square projection with more of the original fascia and wording ‘Liquers’ and ‘Cigars’. This area looks to have been a dumb waiter, now with glass shelving. Both have similar twisted barley columns in black and gold paint. On the left-hand side of the bar is an entrance to a corridor and toilets with a frontage in a similar style to the bar back but looks modern. To the far left a panelled area which looks to be a modern addition.

The long bar to the rear on the right-hand side has a different style of bar back with the longer right-hand section having a plaster or moulded frieze at the top whereas the shorter left-hand section is much plainer. However, the wood seems to be more modern under the dark stain so looks to have been added in refurbishments by Bass, possibly in the 1970s. There have been further refurbishments in 2004 and 2015.

The Princess of Wales has long been associated with the egg-shaped ball – as well as being linked to Blackheath Rugby Club, the oldest in the world, the pub served as a changing room during the first ever international between England and Wales, played on the heath in 1871.

Read More