Using this guide

The descriptions in this guide make clear the significance of each interior. The pubs fall into two distinct categories:

★ On the National Inventory of Historic Pub Interiors for pubs that remain wholly or largely intact since before World War Two, or are exceptional examples of intact post-war schemes completed before 1970, or which retain particular rooms or other internal features of exceptional historic importance.

✰ On the Regional Inventory of Historic Pub Interiors for the scotland. Inclusion criteria are lower than for the National listings but the same principles apply, with the emphasis on the internal fabric and what is authentically old.

In the section More to Try are pubs that are considered to be of 'some regional importance', meaning that the criteria for a full Regional Inventory entry is not satisfied in terms of the overall layout and fittings, but that specific features are of sufficient quality for the pub to be considered noteworthy.


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Contents

Introduction

The National Inventory

The Regional Inventories

Characteristics of Scottish Pubs

Aberdeen & Grampian

Argyll & The Isles

Ayrshire & Arran

Borders

Dumfries & Galloway

Edinburgh & The Lothians

Greater Glasgow & Clyde Valley

Highlands and Western Isles

Loch Lomond, Stirling & The Trossachs

Tayside

Closed Pubs

More to Try

Protecting Heritage Pubs Through Listing

Introduction

This guide describes the 116 pubs identified by CAMRA as having interiors of national or regional historic or architectural importance, plus a further 24 whose interiors are of some regional interest.

Scotland has over 4000 pubs so why do only 3% of them make the grade for this publication? Simply put, the last forty years or so has seen a huge amount of change to the country’s pub stock. Many interiors have been modernised, often involving opening out of what were previously multi-roomed layouts and the removal of original fabric and features. This mania for destruction has, happily, abated somewhat as appreciation of what is genuinely old has increased but in most cases the damage has been done. This makes safeguarding what remains of our pub heritage a serious conservation challenge and, by publishing this guide, we aim to encourage owners and Councils to take steps to ensure the protection of these priceless assets. We also hope that the guide will stimulate increased interest in our historic pubs and encourage more people to use them – because the other major threat is that pubs may be lost altogether as changing social habits and other factors lead to more and more closures.

The National Inventory

Defending our traditional pubs has always been a key aim of CAMRA. Work to compile a National Inventory of Historic Pub Interiors (NI) began in 1991 and the first actual list appeared in 1997, totalling 179 entries. It has since been continually refined and updated as, on the one hand, new candidates were discovered and, on the other, existing entries were closed or ruined. The total currently stands at 284, of which 30 are in Scotland. There are two key criteria for inclusion. Firstly, the interior is largely unaltered since before 1945, though intact early post war pubs are also included (but are very rare). Secondly, the NI covers pubs with specific features or rooms of national significance. Our publication, Britain’s Best Real Heritage Pubs, describes the entries in some detail, as do the ‘long descriptions’ on our website.

The Regional Inventories

These were the next logical step for us. As would be expected, the bar for inclusion is set lower than for the NI though the same principles apply, with the emphasis on the internal fabric of the pub and what is authentically old within it. 81 pubs of this standard can be found in Scotland.

A further category is pub interiors of Some Regional Interest. Although much altered, they will contain some historic features which may be of interest to visitors. 23 such pubs are briefly described in the guide.

Characteristics of Scottish Pubs

Tenements

A distinctive feature of many Scottish pubs, and something rarely seen elsewhere in the UK, is their occupation of the ground floor of tenement blocks of flats, alongside a variety of shops. Tenements are Scotland’s dominant house-building style, in common with much of Europe but not the rest of Britain. These pubs often differ little from adjacent shop-fronts while pubs elsewhere in the country tend to be free-standing or part of a terrace. Most Scottish pubs don’t have living accommodation for licensees because of early 20th-century legislation that banned Sunday opening.

Island Serving Counters

Before the 1880s, Scottish urban pubs had, as in the rest of the UK, a variety of small rooms serving different clienteles. Around this time, licensing magistrates in towns and cities agreed that these arrangements prevented the publican and their staff from exercising proper supervision of their customers. As a result, many pubs were remodelled between then and the early 1900s to create a spacious, often lofty, room with a large island serving counter, usually oval but sometimes in other configurations. (More recently, similar arguments prevailed elsewhere in Britain, resulting in much internal opening-out).

These serveries generally had an ornately-carved central fitment holding mainly whisky casks and sometimes other spirits. Most pubs were designed for stand-up drinking, but some sitting rooms were provided, usually at the front of the pub and well lit to meet authority approval.

This guide features several pubs with such arrangements, the finest being the Horseshoe Bar, Glasgow, with its counter in an elongated horseshoe shape some 32 metres (104 feet) in circumference. It long claimed to be the longest bar counter in the UK but a new pub in Clitheroe probably now holds the title. The Railway Tavern, Shettlestone, in east Glasgow, is the most intact pub in this style; it retains two sitting rooms and, remarkably, an intact family department (off sales).

Other notable examples are the Pittodrie Bar, Aberdeen, the Kenilworth, Edinburgh and the Phoenix, Inverness. A popular variation is the U-shaped counter protruding from a wall, as at the Market Inn, Ayr and Central Bar, Renton.

Later examples include the Prestoungrange Gothenburg, Prestonpans and, from the 1930s, the Brewers Tap, Paisley and the Portland Arms, Shettleston. At the Railway, West Calder and the Woodside, Falkirk, the staff area is about the same size as that for drinkers. In some cases e.g. Fanny by Gaslight, Kilmarnock and the Town Arms, Selkirk, counters have been shortened to increase drinking space.

Ornate Gantries with Spirit Casks

From the 1890s, some pubs were refitted with a straight bar counter and an ornately carved fitting behind known as a ‘gantry’ (deriving from ‘gantress’, an old Scots word to describe a wooden stand for casks.). Gantries usually held polished spirit casks and were decorated with mirrored centrepieces, often advertising brewery or distillery products.

The best example of this feature is at the Old Toll Bar, Glasgow, with its two sets of four whisky casks either side of a central mirror, pediment and central clock. Other dazzling examples, complete with spirit casks, can be found at Bennet’s Bar, Edinburgh and the Volunteer Arms (Staggs), Musselburgh. Two which have lost their casks but remain impressive are at the Rowan Tree, Uddingston and (from 1926) the Grill, Aberdeen.

Just one pub remains where you can still get a ‘dram from the cask’. At the Old Wine Stores, Shotts, the blender William Morton supplied its blend in bulk until quite recently and the no.3 barrel still contains whisky but is topped up now once a fortnight by the landlord.

Sitting Rooms

Not all Scottish pubs are single spaces. Many still have separate rooms termed ‘sitting rooms’ (or ‘snugs’ when very small). These were for ‘respectable’ drinking as against the stand-up format elsewhere in the pub. Good examples are at the Steps, Glasgow, the Clep, Dundee and the Portland Arms, Shettlestone (which has no less than four of them). Sometimes these rooms are designated ‘private’ as seen in the door glass at the Athletic Arms, Edinburgh – but, sadly, the room division was recently removed here.

Ladies’ Room/Ladies’ Snug

Scottish urban pubs were hugely male-dominated and, indeed, a handful (notably the Grill and the Bridge Bar, both in Aberdeen) stayed men-only until the 1976 Sex Discrimination Act outlawed the practice. Until recently, the Imperial, Wishaw only allowed men into the bar with women using the ‘ladies’ snug’ near the entrance. The snug at the Ritz, Cambuslang (not in this guide) is still predominantly used by women.

Family Department

Tiny rooms, or booths, where drink was bought for consumption off the premises, survive in a few places. Customers were generally women or children, sent to collect the family supplies. Bennet’s Bar, Edinburgh has an excellent example, called here the Jug and Bottle. At the Prestoungrange Gothenburg, Prestonpans, the example is termed the Jug Bar while it’s the Family Department at both the Portland Arms, Shettlestone and the Harbour Bar, Kirkcaldy. A very late example is that at the Laurieston Bar, Glasgow, dating from the 1960s when the off-sales habit had begun to die out.

Office

Infrequently seen nowadays are the owner’s or manager’s office. Still used by staff are those at the Old Toll Bar, Glasgow, with an original colourful glass panel, and at the Links Tavern, Leith. The office at the Red Lion, Kelso is accessed through bay five of the gantry while there is a modernised one within the counter of the Horseshoe Bar, Glasgow. At the Brewers Tap, Paisley, the office between the front doors has been converted to a snug.

Brewery and Whisky Mirrors

Many Scottish bars are adorned by old mirrors, usually advertising long-vanished spirits, breweries or beers, as well as soft drinks and, occasionally, tobacco products. Some, such as those at the Pittodrie Bar, Aberdeen, the Barony Bar, Edinburgh and the Old Toll Bar, Glasgow, are of truly epic proportions. Screens set at eye level in front windows were also used for advertising – good examples are at the Dalhousie, Brechin and the Woodside, Falkirk.

Bell Pushes

These can often be spotted on pub walls, especially in sitting rooms and are a reminder of the once-common practice of table service. Ringing the bell triggered a bell-box indicator visible to bar staff. Only a small number of Scottish pubs now offer the service. It is available in two rooms at the Globe, Stranraer and at the Steps Bar, Glasgow (sitting room), the Clep, Dundee (lounge) and the Railway Tavern, Kincardine (right-hand room). Customers in the smoke room of the Viceroy, Govan, Glasgow can avail themselves of table service on Saturday evenings whilst at the Village Tavern, Larkhall, a shout of ‘Hoy’ will secure it for some customers.

Water Taps on the Bar

Scotland is famous for whisky and, as it’s the only spirit that can benefit from a little added water, water taps were a common feature on counter tops. Some survive and a few are even in working order e.g. those at Bennet’s Bar and Ryrie’s Bar, Edinburgh, the Buck Hotel, Langholm and the Rowan Tree, Uddingston. Ceramic jugs can be found on most bars for customers to add their own water. Some Scots say ‘beer is used to wash the whisky down’ which remains true in areas like the Highlands and Islands. In Glasgow, ‘hauf an’a hauf pint’ - a half glass of whisky and a half of beer, with the latter being the chaser – is popular.

Do you know of other pubs to include?

The entries here draw on the accumulated knowledge of CAMRA members and we hope to have identified all interiors worthy of inclusion. However, in such a big area, there may be historic examples which have escaped our notice – if you find one, please let us know. Also, please tell us if you come across significant changes to a listed interior or you become aware of a threat to one of these pubs (info@pubheritage.camra.org.uk).

Aberdeen & Grampian

Aberdeen

6 Bridge Street, Aberdeen, AB11 6JJ

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Aberdeen) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Bridge Bar ✰

Bridge Bar, Aberdeen

Bar

This small, high-ceilinged single bar was a men-only bastion until the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 obliged the admission of women. Even now there is no ladies toilet because there is no room for one. The bar counter and gantry probably date back to the early 20th century and originally went round the back of the room until these parts were removed to create more customer space. The top part of the gantry is supported by Ionic columns. The panelling covering the walls is believed to be old but the date is unknown.

Aberdeen

213 Union Street, Aberdeen, AB11 6BA

Tel: (01224) 573530

Email: info@thegrillaberdeen.co.uk

Website: http://www.thegrillaberdeen.co.uk

Opening Hours: 10-midnight; 10-1am Fri & Sat; 12.30-midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Aberdeen) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

Grill ★

Grill, Aberdeen

Interior

A beautifully appointed pub lies behind an austere exterior in an early 1830s grey granite terrace. It was a restaurant from the 1870s but was turned into a pub in the early 20th century. Having been acquired by a Mr John Innes in 1925, it was refitted the following year under architects Jenkins & Marr. This mainly stand-up bar retains its very fine fittings from that time including a wonderful long mahogany gantry with three glazed cabinets, made, like all the woodwork, by a Mr G. Fordyce of Archibalds. The counter carries the letter ‘G’ along its various sections and has a continuous brass match-striker from the good(!) old days of smoke-filled pubs. The walls are covered in mahogany veneer and the tables, with cast-iron bases, are inscribed with the name of the pub. The plasterwork ceilings are striking with a huge oval at the front and a circular feature at the rear, the craftsmen responsible being named as Messrs R.Watt and G. McGilvery. This was a gents-only bar until the Sex Discrimination Act came into force on 1 January 1976 and ladies’ did not get their toilet until as late as 1998 when the gents’ underwent a sex-change.

Aberdeen

6 - 8 Little Belmont Street, Aberdeen, AB10 1JG

Tel: (01224) 644487

Email: macamerons.aberdeen@belhavenpubs.net

Website: http://www.macamerons-aberdeen.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-midnight; 10-1am Fri & Sat

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Aberdeen) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Not listed

Ma Cameron's ✰

Ma Cameron

Snug

One of Aberdeen’s oldest pubs, ‘Ma’s retains a couple of classic old panelled rooms. The snug has bare bench seating, a hatch for service and two perforated bentwood seats. A partition wall separates the snug from the public bar, which retains its array of old fittings. A small room on the right has been modernised and there has been a massive expansion in recent years but this doesn’t impact adversely on the pair of historic rooms.

Aberdeen

339 King Street, Aberdeen, AB24 5AP

Tel: (01224) 638836

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Pittodrie Bar ✰

Pittodrie Bar, Aberdeen

Bar

The only pub in Aberdeen to retain its original island-style bar, which has one of the best displays of brewery and whisky mirrors in Scotland. While not visually exciting the original oval-shaped counter has a mosaic (former) spittoon trough all around the base, which is rare, and a match-striker running just under the top. The island gantry has been replaced in recent years but is similar in design to the original. There are six large and two small mirrors on the walls including a splendid one for Robert Younger's St Ann’s Brewery by T J Ford of Edinburgh. A small sitting room was lost in the 1960s by the removal of a short glazed partition on the left. The pub is very busy when football is screened.

Aberdeen

7 St Nicholas Lane, Aberdeen, AB10 1HF

Directions: Lane opp Marks & Spencer and parallel to Union Street

Tel: (01224) 640597

Email: princeofwales.aberdeen@belhavenpubs.net

Website: http://www.princeofwales-aberdeen.co.uk

Opening Hours: 10-midnight; 10-1am Fri & Sat; 10-midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Aberdeen) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-9)

Listed Status: Grade C

Prince of Wales ✰

Prince of Wales, Aberdeen

Bar

This late-Victorian granite pub has two carved back gantries and at 18 m (60 ft) the longest bar counter for miles around. Originally it consisted only of the right-hand half of the present-day pub, but, in the 1980s, numbers 9 and 11 to the left were purchased and areas at the front left and rear left created. The long counter has an old spittoon trough around the base with new tiles and the bar top has been replaced. Good collection of brewery and whisky mirrors.

Banchory

22 High Street, Banchory, AB31 5SR

Directions: In town centre on main North Deeside road, opp West church

Tel: (01330) 822547

Email: Enquiries@DouglasArms.co.uk

Website: http://douglasarms.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-midnight; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12-12 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-2:30, 5-9)

Listed Status: Not listed

Douglas Arms Hotel ✰

Douglas Arms Hotel, Banchory

Public Bar

A popular pub that doubles as a hotel with a public bar that has retaining its main features from a refitting of c.1900. The little-changed public bar is dominated by a long panelled counter and a corresponding gantry, the centre part of which has five bays with depressed arches. At each end of the counter there are tall, glazed display cases and from the back of the bar are two hatches (possibly modern insertions) to the rear games room. There are a pair of noteworthy advertising mirrors: on the left one for W B Black of Aberdeen's East India Pale Ale; on the right for Queen's Ale and Vigor Stout from Thompson Marshall (also of Aberdeen). The fixed seating has been replaced and there are a variety of other rooms that are mostly modernised.

Forres

2 - 6 Tollboth Street, Forres, IV36 1PH

Tel: (01309) 672716

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-12.30am; 11-1.30am Fri & Sat; 12-12.30am Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Forres) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Grade C

Red Lion ✰

Formerly three houses that became a hotel in 1838. Public bar on the right has an Art Deco sleek bar counter which may be post war and has a new top. The mirrored bar back with Art Deco top has Formica shelves so may well also be 1950s. Ply panelled walls painted deep red and have bench seating attached. Vestibule entrance has an inner door with etched 'Red Lion Hotel' panel, brick and wood surround fireplace could be 1950/1960s, original 'Campbell & Co's Mild & Pale Ales' mirror. Opened-up in 1997 to a small area on the left which was a snug with a hatch. Lounge on the left is all new having previously been a butchers shop. The gents' has two old urinals.

Fraserburgh

45 Broad Street, Fraserburgh, AB43 9AE

Directions: In lane leading down to Shore Street

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Crown Bar ✰

Tucked away down an alley from Broad Street, this drinkers pub is little altered since it was refitted in c.1960. The only recent change is the addition of a ladies toilet earlier this century. Consists of a long main bar with a counter and gantry running almost all the way along the left hand wall, and ply panelled walls. Look for the working gas heater high up on the wall; the late 1960s/early 1970s Guinness dispenser; and at weekends an old kettle on the bar back which is used to make a popular local drink “Rum and Coffee’ using Camp Coffee (do you remember that?) - some customers prefer to use whisky instead of rum! There is also a small separate lounge which is only in use on a Saturday night.

Argyll & The Isles

Kilmelford

, Kilmelford, PA34 4XA

Tel: (01852) 200274

Email: mail@cuilfail.com

Website: http://www.cuilfail.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11:00-23:00; 12:30-23:00 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12:00-14:30, 17:30-20:30)

Listed Status: Not listed

Cuilfail ★

Cuilfail, Kilmelford

Bar

The main part of the hotel, dating from the 1870s was added to an old drovers’ inn. It is the rather extraordinary interior of the latter which is of interest here. It was refashioned in 1957 (date on the fireplace) and is a now-rare example of the kind of theming that was then so popular. But beware - most of the rocks you see are fakes made out of cement! Extraordinary! As at early 2016 there is talk of restarting on-site brewing (which ceased in 2010).

Lochgilphead

13 Lochnell Street, Lochgilphead, PA31 8JL

Tel: (01546) 602492

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11 (midnight Thu; 1am Fri & Sat); 12.30-midnight Sun

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Commercial ★

Commercial, Lochgilphead

Public Bar Servery

A splendid, small town, three-room pub with a rather remarkable interior. The building itself dates from the early 19th century and was taken over by Ruaridh McKenzie in 1944 who kept the pub until 1983. It is believed he completely refitted it in 1945–6 which would make it an extraordinarily early example of post-war pub refurbishment (the date is almost hard to believe since there was hardly any major work in pubs until about 1953 due to austerity restrictions). In the small public bar there is a curved panelled counter, a gantry with mirrored shelving, and a brick fireplace with mirror signed ‘Ruaridh’ who wishes all ‘Ceud Mile Failte’. A multi-pane door advertises the smoke room and lounge. The smoke room comes first and has a curious door which can separate the smoke from either the corridor or the servery. At the rear is the lounge with a large brick fireplace and original tables. A fun feature is the tiny gents’ loo and its sliding door with glass inscription (for the avoidance of any doubt) ‘Gents Lavatory – Slide it Chum’.

Oban

35 Combie Street, Oban, PA34 4HS

Tel: (01631) 565826

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Oban) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Lochavullin ✰

In a Victorian terrace leading out of town, this pub was refitted in very economical style about 1960 and this work, remarkably, remains intact. Facing the front door is an off-sales opening with a pair of tiny doors and to the right is the public bar. This has ply panelling to the walls, exposed joists in the ceiling and a plain ply bar counter. The rather smaller lounge on the left has its own plain ply counter (but with panels of red upholstery) and plastered walls.

Rothesay, Isle of Bute

3 East Princes Street, Rothesay, PA20 9DL

Tel: (01700) 502095

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 13:00-23:00 Mon-Wed; 13:00-01:00 Thu&Fri; 12:00-01:00 Sat; 12:00-13:00 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

Golfers' Bar ✰

Golfers

Snug

This drinkers' pub, which occupies the ground floor of a tenement built in 1901, still retains most of its refitting from c.1930 in Glasgow Art Nouveau style. The public bar has an impressive mirrored gantry with stained glass cupboard fronts and ten drawers, a long bar counter and extensive panelling. At the front there is a snug accessed via sliding doors with etched windows and partition walls. Around the public bar, just below the floral frieze, there are a series of painted plans depicting all the holes at Rothesay golf course.

The pub is situated close to the ferry terminal, where you will find the most impressive surviving late-Victorian gents public toilets in the UK.

Ayrshire & Arran

Ayr

2 Castlehill Rd, Ayr, KA7 2HT

Tel: (01292) 280391

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 12-1am

Food: Evening Meals

Listed Status: Grade C

Market Inn ✰

Market Inn, Ayr

Servery

This late 19th century building was saved from demolition by a local action group, which included the Ayrshire branch of CAMRA, when the surrounding area was redeveloped c.1999. A popular drinker's pub, it still has many fittings from c.1900, and is one of a handful with an original horseshoe-shaped counter still with the old terrazzo spittoon trough around the base, which, unusually, has a drain. At the rear right where the terrazzo trough finishes, the counter has been turned through 90 degrees to create more space for customers.

Dalry

28-30 Main St, Dalry, KA24 5DH

Tel: (01294) 832394

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Volunteer Arms ✰

Volunteer Arms, Dalry

Front Snug

Built in 1870, this pub has never sold spirits via optics - all are served from the bottle into measures. It has been in the same family for 100 years and the interior is very little changed since refits in 1958 and 1960 and is therefore a rare survivor. The public bar was last refitted in 1958 when a snug at the rear of the bar was removed; it has a counter with slatted vertical timber front and a simple shelved timber gantry. On the left side of the public bar are two small snugs created by floor to ceiling wooden partition walls with high level glass panels and linked to the passage by sliding doors. These have leatherette fixed seating and bell-pushes but the panelling on the walls was renewed in the 1990s. The bell-pushes are still working - each snug and the passage off-sales bell has a different pitch so the staff know which is which and some table service still occurs at least daily. At the rear is an intact lounge created in 1960; this has a counter with ply-panelled front, a mirrored gantry, fixed seating, and two tiled fireplaces with timber mantels.

Kilmarnock

16 Dean Lane, Kilmarnock, KA3 1DS

Tel: (01563) 541128

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Kilmarnock)

Listed Status: Not listed

Black's Bar ✰

Black

Lounge Servery

Single storey wedge-shaped pub retaining a number of bar fittings dating from 1939. The public bar is now L-shaped following the opening-up of a snug on the right. It has an Art Deco style bar counter, and a three-bay gantry where the left and right bays have semi-circular interiors of mosaic mirror glass and the middle bay has plain mirrors. The room has ply panelling to two-thirds height and fixed seating from 1939 which has been re-leatheretted. Off the front lobby, which has a terrazzo floor, is a door that leads to a long narrow snug down the back of the bar with 1960/1970s fittings including a sliding hatch and bell-pushes on the bench seating side.

Kilmarnock

20-22 West George Street, Kilmarnock, KA1 1DG

Tel: (01563) 257641

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-Midnight Mon-Wed; 11-1am Thu-Sat; 12-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Kilmarnock) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime Meals (12-6)

Listed Status: Not listed

Fanny by Gaslight ✰

Fanny by Gaslight, Kilmarnock

Interior

Very much a young persons’ rock music pub with bands on Friday nights, but still of historic interest behind the gaudy paint and dim lighting. Formerly the Fifty Waistcoats and originally the Railway Tavern, the pub was remodelled by Charles H Robinson in 1903, when a massive, oval-shaped bar counter with pilasters spaced regularly along it and a low, three-tier island gantry were installed. In 1980, the bar was reduced by 2.5 m (8 ft) on either side - a new floor makes it difficult to spot the extent of the bar originally but take a look at the island gantry and you can see how it is curved at the lower shelves level on the right but on the left hand side it finishes abruptly. The inner portion of the vestibule on the right hand side has been lost otherwise the room is largely intact with four cast-iron columns with florid Corinthian capitals supporting the beams for the upper floor. The rear snug and office are no longer in use. The large lounge upstairs was turned into a flat in the mid-1980s.

Millport: Isle of Cumbrae

36 Glasgow St, Millport: Isle of Cumbrae, KA28 0DL

Tel: (01475) 530465

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Tavern ✰

Tavern, Millport: Isle of Cumbrae

Servery

This small locals' pub was built in 1895 and despite its modern exterior, it retains its original fittings and old brewery mirrors, but lost its off sales on the front left hand side in about 1970. The decorative bar counter with coat hooks and a spittoon trough around its base looks original; and much of the gantry shelving also looks original; but some of the lower shelves have been lost to fridges. The whole room, including behind the gantry, has floor to ceiling panelling painted cream. There are several fine old mirrors. A modern lounge at the back.

Borders

Ancrum

The Green, Ancrum, TD8 6XH

Directions: on B6400, off A68

Tel: (01835) 830242

Email: crosskeysdining@gmail.com

Website: http://www.ancrumcrosskeys.com

Opening Hours: 5-11 Mon-Thu; 5-1am Fri; 12-1am Sat; 12-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (No Service Mon & Tue; 5.30-9 Wed-Fri; 12-3, 5.30-9 Sat; 12-3, 5.30-8 Sun)

Listed Status: Grade C

Ancrum Cross Keys ✰

Ancrum Cross Keys, Ancrum

Public Bar

Village pub built c.1850 of red sandstone and retaining much of its 1906 refurbishment by Jedburgh Brewery. The passage through the pub has 'Bar' etched panels on the inner doors and a hatch, which was originally for off-sales. The small public bar on the right with a sliding door retains its Edwardian interior fittings of back gantry, original counter (bar top is new) and tiled fireplace. The fixed seating is probably 40 years old. Beyond this is a small dado panelled room with an original fireplace and mirrored overmantel, but the bar counter and fixed seating are modern additions. The rear two rooms have been brought into use and the only item of interest is the overhead 'tram lines' used for moving heavy casks as this was the original cellar.

Coldstream

75-77 High St., Coldstream, TD12 4AE

Tel: (01890) 882391

Email: wayne@besom-inn.co.uk

Website: http://www.besom-inn.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-Midnight Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12.30-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-2, 6.30-8.30 Mon-Sat; 12.30-3, 6.30-8.30 Sun)

Listed Status: Grade C

Besom ✰

Besom, Coldstream

Bar

Three-roomed town centre pub with a little-altered Edwardian bar and a room dedicated to the Coldstream Guards. Built in the 1890s and revamped c.1910 the public bar retains its original bar counter and gantry, 1950s dado panelling and original 'Bar' etched glass panel in the door. The lounge has 'Smoke Room’ etched in the panel of its door. The hatch was replaced by a small bar counter in c.1990. The pub was extended to the rear in 1954, and through the wooden archway is a room with full-height panelling, bell-pushes and Coldstream Guards memorabilia, including a visitor’s book. The pool room on the right has been brought into use recently.

Galashiels

57/58 Bank Street, Galashiels, TD1 1EP

Tel: (01896) 758655

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11(12.30 Sun) - 11(1am Fri & Sat)

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Galashiels)

Listed Status: Grade C

Auld Mill Inn ✰

Auld Mill Inn, Galashiels

Bar

The original layout of two rooms and a passage has been lost. However, it retains a 100 year old gantry with a number of mirrored panels. Original counter retains its old bar top despite a period of time covered by a Formica one, but there is a new frontage, albeit attached to the original. Note the inter-war frosted windows. The ladies' still has the old 'penny in the slot' on the door.

Galashiels

22 High Street, Galashiels, TD1 1SE

Tel: (01896) 753520

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Harrow Inn ✰

Harrow Inn, Galashiels

Interior

Town centre pub built 1868, refitted c.1900, and still retaining its splendid island bar counter with canopy running all the way around. The counter retains old match strikers and water taps both are now no longer in use; the pot shelf is modern. The small island gantry could be over 30 years old, and there are remains of two old fireplaces in this large panelled room. The public bar has been opened-up to the area at rear right.

Hawick

1 Silver St., Hawick, TD9 0AD

Directions: off SW end of High St.

Tel: (01450) 376067

Email: daltonsbar@btinternet.com

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Exchange Bar [Dalton's] ✰

Exchange Bar [Dalton

Interior 2

A mid 19c three-storey tenement building where the Hawick Co-Op opened a store in 1839, but it became the Exchange Bar in 1885. The most impressive interior feature is the very ornate cornice, there are good ceiling roses and the large single room has floor to ceiling panelling. From the 1960s to the 1980s the panelling was covered by plasterboard and wallpaper. It's thought that the bar counter dates from the 1880s, and lower shelves of the gantry are old. Two former snugs have now been removed.

Hawick

11 Green Terrace, Hawick, TD9 0JG

Directions: Up Hope St. on SW edge of town

Tel: (01450) 377469

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-2.30,5-11 Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri&Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Listed Status: Not listed

High Level Bar ✰

High Level Bar, Hawick

Bar

A c.1900 terraced drinkers' pub with a splendid unaltered public bar. It retains the original semi-circle bar counter, two-part mirrored back gantry, half-height panelling, but the fixed seating has been replaced. Note the old bell-box opposite the counter. The jug bar has seen some changes but retains its hatch and an etched door pane has been re-sited. The modernised lounge on the right has an old panel in the door etched with 'Sitting Rooms', indicating it was formerly two small rooms.

Jedburgh

52 High St., Jedburgh, TD8 6DQ

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Railway Tavern ✰

Railway Tavern, Jedburgh

Bar

Although lacking fittings of quality, this small three-roomed basic locals' boozer is a throwback to the early 1960s. A sliding door leads into the bar on the right with a Formica fronted counter (the top was replaced in early 1980s) and simple mirror back gantry with Formica shelves below. There is a small 1930s cast-iron fireplace with Art Deco detailing, a dado of ply panelling and leatherette-covered wall benches. There is a little used, tiny, ply-panelled lounge with leatherette seating on the left. An upstairs bar has a bar counter installed in 1980s, replacing a hatch. The brick fireplace, leatherette seating and tables all date from the early 1960s.

Kelso

Crawford Street, Kelso, TD5 7DP

Directions: Off Market Sq., behind Cross Keys Hotel

Tel: (01573) 224817

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 12-11 Mon-Thu; 12-Midnight Fri &Sat; 12-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Listed Status: Grade C

1905 ✰

1905, Kelso

Bar

Situated just off the market place, this multi-roomed pub built in 1905 has been greatly modernised, with the rear rooms popular with young people. However, the public bar retains its original fittings virtually unaltered. There is a splendid back gantry of seven bays, six of which have old mirrors including one for 'Murray's Edinburgh Ale'. In the fifth bay is a door to the office behind and on the top of the gantry are six old spirit casks. The carved bar counter is the original and the public bar is separated from the rest of the interior by a low partition, which has lost its door.

Oxton

3 Main St, Oxton, TD2 6PN

Tel: 07813 796662

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Tower Hotel ✰

Tower Hotel, Oxton

Public Bar

A small hotel built 1903 in typical Edwardian-style, with an angular corner tower. The public bar is still intact, retaining its simple counter and plain, four-bay gantry with large areas of mirrors and several drawers for cash and small items. Features include a vestibule entrance, stained and leaded pictorial front windows, contemporary fireplace and half-height panelling with vertical moulding. The lounge and dining room have no old fittings.

Selkirk

1 Market Place, Selkirk, TD7 4BT

Tel: (01750) 20185

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11(12.30 Sun) - midnight(1am Fri & Sat)

Listed Status: Grade B

Town Arms ✰

Town Arms, Selkirk

Interior

A small town centre pub with a local's stand-up public bar. The U-shaped bar counter is in relative terms large compared to the space for the customers. In order to create more room, the counter was cut back in 2006 by some 40 cm (16 in), although this is not obvious as the floor was replaced at the same time, and modern shelving took the place of the modest gantry. Erected in 1876 with a distinctive, gabled frontage, the building became a pub in 1905. The former public meeting room, defined by an area with a cornice containing Scottish thistles, was expanded to the right by the absorption of a passage. The public bar has four large advertising mirrors; two for Dryborough's and one each for Jeffrey's IPA and Bertram's Scotch Whisky. The wall-panelling was replaced c.1985. A former snug at the back on the left is now a darts room. The upstairs room has modern fittings. Note the rare metal fly-screens (advertising Drybrough ales) in the front windows.

Westruther

, Westruther, TD3 6NE

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

Old Thistle Inn ✰

Old Thistle Inn, Westruther

Public Bar

Built 1721 originally as two cottages and a coach house at one time, this is a country pub with three small rooms that last changed in the late 1940s. When the nearby Spottiswood House was demolished during World War II a number of fittings were imported to the pub. On the right is a very small public bar with an old bar counter, gantry, fixed seating and a semi-circular brick fireplace with wooden seats each side. The carved mantelpiece including a central mirror and carved eagle may be over 250 years old having come from Spottiswood House. A bell push on the left of the servery is unusually hidden by a flap with the wording "Ring". In the entrance passage there is the old off-sales hatch at the bottom of the stairs. To the left is a small lounge with old 'Lounge' lettering on the door. The rooms retain their numbers.

Dumfries & Galloway

Annan

10 High Street, Annan, DG12 6AG

Tel: (01461) 202385

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Wed; 11-Midnight Thu-Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale and Real Cider

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Annan) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Blue Bell Inn ✰

Blue Bell Inn, Annan

Bar

In 1917 all the pubs in Annan became part of the Gretna State Management Scheme, one of a handful of such schemes in the UK, and they continued to be owned by the government until 1972. The idea was to control the consumption of alcohol by workers in the munitions factories at Gretna and, under the scheme, the Blue Bell was refitted and is not much changed since. This former coaching inn, where Hans Christian Anderson is said to have stayed, dates back to 1770, but the red sandstone building is now mainly mid 19th-century, although it still retains its stables at the rear. The main change in the last 50 years has been the removal of a sliding screen on the left of the entrance which gives the pub an open-plan feel. All the walls are covered in inter-war panelling, as is the bar counter, but the counter top and back gantry have been replaced in the past 30-odd years. There was a tiny snug on the right-hand side until the 1970s. The gents' is intact with its panelled ante-room, tiled inner room and original Shanks urinals.

Dumfries

56 High Street, Dumfries, DG1 2JA

Tel: (01387) 252335

Email: mail@globeinndumfries.co.uk

Website: http://www.globeinndumfries.co.uk/

Opening Hours: 10-11 Mon-Wed; 10-Midnight Thu; 10-1am Fri & Sat; 11.30-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Dumfries) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (10-3 Mon-Sun)

Listed Status: Grade A

Globe Inn (High St) ✰

Globe Inn (High St), Dumfries

Snug

Dumfries is famous for its connections with Scotland's patriot bard Robert Burns, and the Globe Inn is known as the Burns Howff i.e. his favourite pub. This mid 18th-century brick building is situated down a narrow wynd (alley) off the High Street. Opposite the entrance is a sliding door that leads into the old wood panelled snug bar, created by wooden partition walls with wall bench seating attached. The snug retains its old back gantry of shelves on a tongue-and-grooved walls and bar counter. At the front of the pub are two small 18th-century panelled rooms brought into use as dining rooms in recent years. The Burns bedroom upstairs has etchings on two windowpanes that have been authenticated as being written by Burns.

Dumfries

97 St Michael Street, Dumfries, DG1 2PY

Tel: (013873) 20873

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 1.30pm-11pm Mon-Thu; 1.30pm-1am Fri; 11am-1am Sat; 11am-11pm Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Dumfries) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Ship Inn ✰

Ship Inn, Dumfries

Bar

Situated opposite St Michael's churchyard, where you will find Burns' mausoleum, is this small three-roomed pub that has been little altered in 40 years. It was converted from an early Victorian house into a two-roomed pub with snugs in c.1900. A vestibule entrance leads into the small public bar, which has an original mirrored back gantry with a modern top section. The original bar counter has a panelled frontage probably added in the 1960s and a new top. Prior to 1960s there was a row of three small snugs down the left side and another on the front right. Horizontal panelled walls probably date from the 1960s.

Langholm

High Street, Langholm, DG13 0JH

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Buck Hotel ✰

Buck Hotel, Langholm

Bar

Mid 18th-century small hotel that has been modernised but retains its narrow public bar with two old back gantries. On the left the gantry has a mirrored back and two narrow mirror strips while the one on the right has slender supports and holds 50 single malt whiskies. The bar counter with two sets of disused beer engine handles and a working water tap is at least 50 years old and curves in front of the right gantry. Other old features include the panelled walls and ceiling, a 100-year-old cast-iron and glazed brick fireplace but the seating is modern. The front door leads into a Victorian tiled hallway with an old bell-box and a hatch for service. The sitting room at the rear was converted to a lounge in the early 1970s and on the left is a modernised games room, which was formerly two small rooms.

Stranraer

4-6 Bridge Street, Stranraer, DG9 7HY

Tel: (01776) 703386

Email: gingerexplosion@yahoo.com

Website: http://www.thegrapes1862.co.uk/

Opening Hours: 11-11.30 (midnight Thu-Sat); 12.30-11.30 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Stranraer Harbour) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Grapes ✰

Grapes, Stranraer

Servery and Bell Box

Town centre pub little altered in 50 years and now coming up again after years of decline. Originally a coaching inn, the present building was erected in 1862 and still has the former stables at the rear. The mainly stand-up bar has a gantry at least 100 years old incorporating a brewery mirror, a 1950s bar counter front with a new top, tongue-and-groove panelled walls and old fixed seating. Upstairs the lounge with '6' on the door has a 1930s Art Deco gantry and counter that came from a hotel in Ayr in the 1950s.

Edinburgh & The Lothians

Broxburn

7 Station Road, Broxburn, EH52 5QF

Tel: (01506) 856347

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Masonic Arms ✰

Masonic Arms, Broxburn

Public Bar

A late 1890s corner pub that consists of a long, narrow stand-up bar with a five-bay back gantry holding six spirit casks. The public bar, which is likely to have been divided by a partition in the past, retains its fine original bar counter. Half-height panelling features throughout along with etched window screens, one inscribed 'T. Bain Masonic Arms'; and an old Usher's Pale Ale' mirror. The vestibule has 'Bar' etched in the door panel. Through a large archway at the rear is a games room, previously two rooms.

Edinburgh

3-5 Rose St., Edinburgh, EH2 2PR

Directions: city centre

Tel: (0131) 225 5276

Email: enquiries@theabbotsford.com

Website: http://theabbotsford.com

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-Midnight Fri & Sat; 11-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Edinburgh Waverley) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-10)

Listed Status: Grade B

Abbotsford Bar & Restaurant ★

Abbotsford Bar & Restaurant, Edinburgh

Snack Bar

The Abbotsford was built in 1902 to designs by one of Edinburgh’s most prolific pub architects, Peter Lyle Henderson, for Charles Jenner of Edinburgh’s famous department store and features one of the finest examples of the typically Scottish island-style servery. Unusually there is no gantry in the middle, which no doubt explains the mahogany superstructure on top of the counter. Although such features, normally designed to hold pot-shelves, are now very common in pubs, they are usually no older than the 1960s and this example is a very early and ornate precursor of the type. The panelled walls have inlaid mirrors and there is a richly decorated high plaster ceiling. In the far left corner is the original snack counter, with a fine balustraded and mirrored gantry and various drawers. On the back wall opposite Rose Street is an annunciator box, which indicates that at one time (in addition to the main bar) there was a dining room, a private room and a smoking room. Alterations took place in the 1970s when the first floor was acquired for pub use and a staircase inserted.

Edinburgh

1-3 Angle Park Terrace, Edinburgh, EH11 2JX

Directions: 1m SW of centre

Tel: (0131) 337 3822

Email:

Website: http://athleticarms.com

Opening Hours: 11-1am

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Athletic Arms [Diggers] ✰

Athletic Arms [Diggers], Edinburgh

Bar

Though some regard the Diggers as a shadow of its former self, the basic layout is largely unchanged since Scottish & Newcastle bought it in the 1990s. The main changes have been a new bar counter and top and removal of the partitions which formed the separate jug bar and private bar. A solid wooden screen has also gone from the top of the bar counter, along with three tall fonts. Original features include the back gantry of sturdy, well-carved wood, the small, oak island gantry and the screened Publican's Office area. Away to the right, separated by a glazed screen, is a small back room with tongue-and-groove timber dado and brass service bells. This is one of only a handful of city pubs always to have sold real ale and was renowned for serving McEwan's 80% at lightning speed by up to 15 red-jacketed barmen. In the past, customers would raise their fingers on entering to show how many pints they wanted and they would be on the bar by the time they reached it.

Edinburgh

81-85 Broughton Street, Edinburgh, EH1 3RJ

Directions: E edge of New Town

Tel: (0131) 556 9251

Email: info@thebaroney.co.uk

Website: https://www.thebarony.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-1am

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale and Real Cider

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Edinburgh Waverley) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-10 Mon-Sat; 12-6 Sun)

Listed Status: Grade B

Barony Bar ★

Barony Bar, Edinburgh

Public Bar

A relatively small L-shaped, single-bar pub with a luscious interior. Located in an 1804 four-storey tenement, it wraps around a florist’s shop on the street corner and has an attractive teak frontage. The interior is notable for its 1899 decorative scheme by John Forrester. The multi-coloured tiled dado includes small pictorial panels of rural Scottish scenes (sadly, mostly hidden by seating – why were they placed so low? – this must always have been a problem). The counter, ornate gantry and two tiled fireplaces (with mirrored overmantels) are all from the late Victorian scheme. As with so many historic Scottish pubs, there are advertising mirrors, in this case a massive pair proclaiming McLaughlan Bros’ wares and also, around the corner, one promoting William Younger’s India Pale Ale. Originally, the right-hand front door led to a jug and bottle, and there were a couple of snugs at the rear.

Edinburgh

8 Leven Street, Edinburgh, EH3 9LG

Directions: SW edge of centre

Tel: (0131) 229 5143

Email: bennetsbar@live.co.uk

Website: http://www.bennetsbaredinburgh.co.uk/

Opening Hours: 12-1am

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-9)

Listed Status: Grade B

Bennets Bar ★

Bennets Bar, Edinburgh

Public Bar

Edinburgh’s finest historic pub interior after the Café Royal. The pub was designed in 1891 by architect George Lyle and refitted in 1906. The main bar stretches back from the street and down the left-hand side is the servery, with a flamboyant five-bay gantry housing four spirit casks, the last to survive in an Edinburgh pub: the counter top has two still functioning water dispensers while at the base is a marble spittoon trough. On the right, above the seating, is a four-bay mirrored and arcaded feature with tilework populated by cherubs and figures in Classical dress (painted by W.B. Simpson & Sons of London). A particular delight, to the left as you enter, is a tiny snug with a hatch and a door into the servery. The glasswork is varied and interesting, such as the swirly Art Nouveau windows to the street, and door panel advertisements offering the blandishments of Jenkinson’s beers and aerated waters, not to mention Jeffrey’s lager. At the end of the bar an enormous mirror advertises Bernard’s IPA.

Edinburgh

19 West Register St., Edinburgh, EH2 2AA

Directions: off E end of Princes St.

Tel: (0131) 556 1884

Email: hello@caferoyaledinburgh.co.uk

Website: http://www.caferoyaledinburgh.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Wed; 11-Midnight Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 11-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Edinburgh Waverley) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-9.45)

Listed Status: Grade A

Cafe Royal ★

Cafe Royal, Edinburgh

Interior

This famous Edinburgh pub has a truly stunning interior. The building, by architect Robert Paterson, dates from 1861 and opened as a showroom for gas and sanitary fittings, but by 1863 had became the Café Royal Hotel. From the 1890s major alterations took place and much of what we see dates from 1900–1. The main space has six wonderful tiled paintings made by Doultons, designed by John Eyre and painted by Katherine Sturgeon and W. J. W. Nunn: they show six famous inventors; Benjamin Franklin, Michael Faraday, Robert Peel (calico printing), William Caxton, George Stephenson and James Watt (with Matthew Boulton). The counter was replaced in 1979 and a new tall gantry was installed in 2002. The fixed seating takes the form of a series of semi-circular areas against the outside walls. Beyond an ornate screen lies the up-market restaurant with more tiled murals plus eight stained-glass windows of British sportsmen, made by Ballantine & Gardiner of Edinburgh. It has a counter with small tiled panels and a mottled red marble counter: note also a revolving door from the 1920s.

Edinburgh

4 South College St., Edinburgh, EH8 9AA

Directions: Off Nicholson St

Tel: 07493 555702

Email: CaptainsEdinburgh@hotmail.com

Website: http://captainsedinburgh.webs.com

Opening Hours: 2-1am Mon-Fri; 1-1am Sat; 2-1am Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Edinburgh Waverley) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

Captain's Bar ✰

Captain

Bar

A small, basic but friendly drinkers' pub situated in a five-storey c1790 tenement block. The long narrow bar has old dado panelled walls, a fine 'James Gray whiskies' mirror and the original back gantry, running the length of the room with an odd kink in the middle.. The original full-length counter was replaced by a much shorter one in the 1960/1970s and has two water taps that still work but are not used. At the front right is a small snug area that was originally separate with its own entrance door.

Edinburgh

142 Dundas Street, Edinburgh, EH3 5DQ

Directions: N edge of New Town

Tel: (0131) 556 1067

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 4-11.30 Mon; 11-11.30 Tue-Thu; 11-12.30am Fri & Sat; 11-10 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Clark's Bar ✰

Clark

Servery

In the base of a tenement, this basic bar, converted from a shop in 1899, has a high ceiling, good cornices and old dado panelling. Originally the bar counter was circular but changes in the 1960s saw the gantry moved to the right-hand wall and the current bar counter installed. The gantry was subsequently replaced in 1990. A number of mirrors, some of them old, adorn the walls. The two small wood-panelled sitting rooms have seating probably dating from the 1960s, as well as bell-pushes.

Edinburgh

1 Queensferry Street, Edinburgh, EH2 4PA

Directions: Off west end of Princes St.

Tel: (0131) 225 3549

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11 - midnight (1am Fri & Sat); 12.30 - 11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Haymarket) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

H. P. Mather [Mathers West End] ★

H. P. Mather [Mathers West End], Edinburgh

Bar Counter and Gantry

This high-ceilinged, single-room pub is little changed in over 100 years. It is on the ground floor of a five-storey building, designed in 1900 by Sydney Mitchell & Wilson for the National Commercial Bank of Scotland and the Caledonian United Services Club. The wine merchant Hugh Mather took over and established the licensed premises in 1902. In the porch there is floor-to-ceiling tiling and, within the pub itself, the counter is original (but new top) as are the half-height panelling, ceiling and rich frieze. The great feature is the towering gantry: its central parts are original although the side portions have been added later, but it is not easy to spot the joins! This was perhaps in 1956 when plans were drawn up to remove a small snug in the rear left-hand corner. The walls are adorned by a number of old brewery mirrors. A change in the 1960s relocated the ladies’ toilet from the rear right corner to downstairs. An old water engine which dispensed beer by air pressure is still in existence and may be viewed on request.

Edinburgh

45-47 Ratcliffe Terrace, Edinburgh, EH9 1SU

Directions: 1.5m S of centre.

Tel: (0131) 667 7205

Email: info@lesliesbaredinburgh.co.uk

Website: http://www.realalepubedinburgh.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11 - Midnight(1am Fri & Sat)

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-8)

Listed Status: Grade B

John Leslie [Leslie's Bar] ★

John Leslie [Leslie

Right-hand side of the Island Bar

A magnificent pub of 1899 set in a tenement and the work of architect P. L. Henderson. Immediately on the left on entering is a small snug, separated from the lounge by a low panelled screen with semi-circular stained glass panels. However, the unique feature at Leslie’s is the gantry-like structure on the left-hand side of the servery, with its series of small ticket booth-style windows for service into the lounge. This arrangement is akin to snob screens in Victorian pubs in English cities which allowed customers a sense of privacy. At the far end of the counter is an elegant mahogany gantry with display cabinets. Other original features include an ornate plaster cornice and decorative ceiling. The dado panelling is said to have come from a neighbouring house during a restoration in 1958. At the rear of the lounge is another snug, also of 1958.

Edinburgh

152 Rose Street, Edinburgh, EH2 3JD

Directions: city centre

Tel: (0131) 226 1773

Email:

Website: http://www.nicholsonspubs.co.uk/thekenilworthrosestreetedinburgh

Opening Hours: 10(12.30 Sun) - 11(midnight Fri & Sat)

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale and Real Cider

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (10-10pm)

Listed Status: Grade A

Kenilworth ★

Kenilworth, Edinburgh

Island bar interior

The building originated about 1780 while the interior, by architect Thomas Purves Marwick, dates from 1899 for Peter Fisher, whose family were wine and spirit merchants. It was given a careful restoration for Alloa Brewery in 1966 by architects Covell Matthews. It is one of four impressive pubs in Edinburgh with an island bar. The island gantry is a fine piece of pub furnishing. The walls are covered in blue and white Minton tiles, topped off with rows of brown and cream tiles, finishing some two-thirds up the double-height public bar, which has a patterned plasterwork ceiling in turquoise and cream. There is a massive mirror advertising Dryborough’s ales of Edinburgh, made by Forrest & Son of Glasgow who were major suppliers of such mirrors. The pot-shelf and short partitioning attached to the bar are 1966 additions, which is also the date of the Scott Room, a small room added down a new passage to the rear. Note the Art Nouveau-style stained glass windows on the front and side in the first-floor area.

Edinburgh

8 Young St., Edinburgh, EH2 4JB

Directions: New Town, off Charlotte Sq.

Tel: (0131) 539 7119

Email: oxford8bar@outlook.com

Website: http://www.oxfordbar.co.uk

Opening Hours: 12-Midnight Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

Oxford Bar ★

Oxford Bar, Edinburgh

Public Bar

The building became a pub in 1811, then a confectioners by 1843, returning to pub use in 1893. It is a small, no-frills affair which has become something of an Edinburgh institution. At the front left is a tiny stand-up bar with just two window benches seating about four people, and a few stools. There is an old fireplace on the far left, partly covered up by the counter and thus predating the existing servery arrangements. The simple mirrored gantry may date from the late 19th-century and has been added to with some basic shelving. Up three steps and through the doorway on the right is a sitting room with shutters. It also has a (possibly) 1950s brick fireplace and an old mirror promoting Murray’s Pale Ale.

Edinburgh

7 Piershill Place, Edinburgh, EH8 7EH

Directions: Near Jock's Lodge

Tel: (0131) 661 6661

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11.30(12.30am Fri-Sat)

Listed Status: Grade B

Porters [Piershill Tavern] ✰

Porters [Piershill Tavern], Edinburgh

Servery

Recently reopened little-altered pub of 1893 with three rooms and floor mosaic at the entrance telling us this pub used to be called the Piershill Tavern. The main bar has a counter and panelling dating from just before or after the First World War. The gantry was, no doubt, remodelled at the same time but may incorporate earlier columns. Some rearrangement has taken place at the front with the jug bar (named in window glass) now incorporated into the main space. There is an odd little hatch between the jug bar area and the modernised lounge to the left with dado square panelling all around,

Edinburgh

37 Rose Street, Edinburgh, EH2 2NH

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

Robertson's 37 Bar ✰

Robertson

Bar

Rose Street is popular for a pub crawl and this is one of three real heritage pubs along it. It retains its splendid tall ornately carved original gantry and what is believed to be the original bar counter which has a frontage added in the 1960s and a renewed top. Built as a four-storey red sandstone dwelling in the 19th-century, the interior by P L Henderson is dated 1898. Quite possibly the bar was much as it is today. apart from the rear left section where the toilets used to be - these are now downstairs. The only other recent change is the removal of some fixed seating on the right c.2000 to create more space.

Edinburgh

1 Roseburn Terrace, Edinburgh, EH12 5NG

Directions: 1.5m W of centre

Tel: (0131) 337 1067

Email: info@roseburnbar.co.uk

Website: https://www.roseburnbar.co.uk

Opening Hours: 9am-11 Mon-Wed; 9am-Midnight Thu-Sat; 11-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Roseburn Bar ✰

Roseburn Bar, Edinburgh

Bar

At the foot of an 1880s four-storey tenement, this large high-ceilinged public bar is thought to be much as it was, though the original gantry, as the photo in the bar shows, was increased in height in 1990. The old counter has two substantial but short partitions with mirrored panels and, rising from them, two columns with decorative capitals. The lounge, with its separate entrance in Roseburn Street, has an old counter and three columns, but the gantry and fireplace are modern. On the right is the small, separate, modernised Fly Half Bar.

Edinburgh

1 Haymarket Terrace, Edinburgh, EH12 5EY

Directions: 1m W of centre

Tel: (0131) 337 0550

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11(12.30 Sun) - 1am

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale and Real Cider

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Haymarket (Edinburgh)) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-7pm)

Listed Status: Grade B

Ryries ✰

Ryries, Edinburgh

Bar

This busy pub with its splendid wooden frontage occupies two buildings and was redesigned by Robert MacFarlane Cameron in 1906 for Messrs Ryrie and Company, whisky merchants. Entrance doors on the left both have ‘Bar’ leaded panels in them, suggesting that the single bar space may have been like this for a very long time. The good, spreading gantry with a still-working clock over the centre is unaltered but, sadly, there is unnecessary clutter on the top including some false casks. The original bar counter formerly curved around on the right but was shortened in 1992 to improve staff access and some panelling was re-sited. There are still working water taps on the bar that were replaced in the 1980s and some attractive coloured glass advertising various drinks. The right-hand building houses a small sitting room popular with diners. Upstairs is a modern lounge with a ‘Sitting Room’ window.

Edinburgh

25 Forrest Road, Edinburgh, EH1 2QH

Directions: 0.5m S of centre

Tel: (0131) 225 2751

Email: sandybellsedinburgh@gmail.com

Website: http://www.sandybellsedinburgh.co.uk

Opening Hours: 12-1am Mon-Sat; 12.30-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Edinburgh Waverley) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Sandy Bell's ✰

Sandy Bell

Bar

A small folk music pub barely altered in 50 years and with live music seven nights a week and also on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. It has an old gantry, bar counter, vestibule entrance and a fireplace covered by seating. The two rooms are divided by a pedimented arch; the wood panel on the counter was replaced by a glass one in recent years. The rear room has been extended by absorbing a narrow passage.

Edinburgh

19a West Register Street, Edinburgh, EH2 2AA

Tel: (0131) 556 7060

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade A

Voodoo Rooms ★

Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh

Interior

The first floor part of the Café Royal is a separate Bar, Restaurant, Live Music Venue and Cabaret Club. The bar looks very different from the photo on the front of Scotland’s True Heritage Pubs as the ceiling is now painted black and picked out in gold; the floor is of standard wood panels; new tiles near the bar counter; the original bar has a new front and new top; and there are seating areas down the window side of the room. In the second bar all the partitions and the 1920s bar fittings have been retained; floor in American Bar has had the same treatment as the main bar; seating areas have been added to the restaurant section. The Ballroom can have an admission charge – it retains its wood block floor; the ceiling is now painted black and picked out in gold; and a sound booth has been added. Open from 12 noon to 12 midnight. No real ale.

Edinburgh, Duddingston

43 The Causeway, Edinburgh, EH15 3QA

Directions: 1.5m SE of centre

Tel: (0131) 661 7974

Email: enquiry@thesheepheidedinburgh.co.uk

Website: http://www.thesheepheidedinburgh.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-Midnight Fri & Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-10)

Listed Status: Grade B

Sheep Heid Inn ✰

Sheep Heid Inn, Edinburgh Duddingston

Bar

The interior here dates from a refurbishment of c.1936, which is the date of the bar counter, gantry and mirrors. At that time the room on the left was two snugs/parlours with a small snug to the right of the bar. The wall separating the two snugs was removed c.1968 and the snug near the bar removed in the early 1970s to create a fire escape for the upstairs dining room. The snug is visible in a photo on the wall of the bar. A third room at the rear left is in a 1950s extension, leading to the skittle alley which dates from 1880s.

Edinburgh, Henderson St.

1-2 Yardheads, Edinburgh, EH6 6BU

Tel: (0131) 467 7109

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Anderson's Bar [Ghillies] ✰

Anderson

Bar

Situated at the bottom of an 1886 tenement, the few alterations since the bar opened are no doubt accounted for by it only having had four owners. The long, narrow, dado-panelled public bar has an old counter with a new top plus a gantry with an old lower portion but a more recent top half. An unusual feature here is that customers can stand in the servery area though the coal fire which perhaps once attracted them is now covered over; they use the counter to play dominoes. The left-hand door leads to a tiny jug bar but the partition door has been removed and only part of the screen on the counter top remains. The front sitting room on the right has ply panelling, 1960s fixed seating and formica-topped tables.

Edinburgh, Joppa

44 Joppa Road, Edinburgh, EH15 2ET

Directions: 3m E of centre

Tel: (0131) 669 3323

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11 - Midnight(12.45am Fri & Sat); 12.30 - 11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Ormelie Tavern ✰

Ormelie Tavern, Edinburgh Joppa

Servery

Originally a grocers shop at the base of a tenement, this became a pub in c.1904. A photograph hanging over the gantry taken in about 1920 shows the present bar fittings but on top of the gantry a row of spirit casks which were removed in the 1970s when a false ceiling was added. The gantry has ornately carved and attractively painted pillars holding up the top shelf along with a new main shelf top but some lower shelving has been lost by the insertion of two small fridges. The old bar counter front has also been painted mainly black with vertical strips painted gold. There were once four snugs here and, happily, two remain - one on the front left, slightly opened out, and the other rear left with a doorway and impressive Campbell's mirror.

Edinburgh, Leith

Leith Walk, Edinburgh, EH6 8LN

Tel: (0131) 555 2006

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade A

Central Bar ★

Central Bar, Edinburgh Leith

Island Bar Interior

A down-to-earth drinkers’ pub at the foot of Leith Walk which has one of Scotland’s most stunning interiors. It was built in 1899 to designs by one of Scotland’s leading pub architects, Peter Lyle Henderson. This tall, nearly square space started life as the bar for Leith’s long-gone Central Station (closed 1972: see The Station Buffet, Stalybridge and The Station Buffet, Bridlington for historic English station buffets). Either side are entrance porches (with mosaic flooring and stained glass windows), leading into a room in which the walls are completely covered with Minton Hollins tiles. The side walls are notable for four tiled panels of sporting scenes – yacht racing, hare-coursing, golf and shooting – with tall, narrow mirrors between. The U-shaped counter backs on to a stunning oak gantry which has glazed cupboards for cigars etc, and sprouts the figures of four griffins. In the middle of the servery there is the base of a small island gantry. On the left are four U-shaped seating areas. The ceiling is papier-maché with Jacobean detailing. Window screens with coloured glass bear the name of John Doig who was the first proprietor. At the back there were originally two sitting rooms but they are now converted to storage areas. Listing upgraded to A in 2008 as a result of survey work by CAMRA.

Edinburgh, Leith

5-7 Restalrig Road, Edinburgh, EH6 8BB

Tel: (0131) 467 7471

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Links Tavern ✰

Links Tavern, Edinburgh Leith

Bar

Although the original counter and gantry at this drinkers' pub were replaced in 1995, there is still much of interest and the traditional plan, including two snugs, remains. The gantry is positioned between the two pub entrances, and screens with attractive coloured glass form the two tiny rooms, one of which is now used as an office, Other original features include the fielded panelling round the walls, a fire-surround with pink and green marble and (most of!) a St Andrew’s cross in tile and three original William Younger's advertising mirrors.

Edinburgh, Leith

3 Shore, Edinburgh, EH6 6QW

Directions: 1.5m S of centre

Tel: (0131) 553 5080

Email: theshorebar@fishersrestaurantgroup.co.uk

Website: http://www.fishersbistros.co.uk/the-shore-bar-and-restaurant.php

Opening Hours: 12-1am Mon-Sat; 12.30-12.30am Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-10.30)

Listed Status: Grade B

Shore ✰

Shore, Edinburgh Leith

Public Bar

In the ground floor of a four-storey tenement built in 1802, the public bar has a virtually intact interior dating from 1884. There is an interesting entrance with a curved timber partition. The bar has old wall panelling, a panelled bar counter, a gantry with barley twist columns, old fixed seating and a fireplace with glazed red brick interior with cupboards in the panelling to the left of it. On the rear wall is a floor to ceiling plain mirror that makes the room seem much bigger than it is. A door with a lovely colourful stained and leaded panel above (of fruit?) leads to a panelled room on the right now set up as a restaurant.

Edinburgh, Morningside

237 Morningside Road, Edinburgh, EH10 4QU

Tel: (0131) 447 1484

Email: info@cannymans.co.uk

Website: http://www.cannymans.co.uk

Opening Hours: 12-11

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-9)

Listed Status: Grade B

Volunteer Arms [Canny Man's] ✰

Volunteer Arms [Canny Man

Main Bar

Famous multi-roomed pub with walls obscured from skirting board to ceiling with a vast collection of memorabilia accumulated over the years that impart a unique atmosphere. Please note the sign 'Dress casual but smart' on entering via the door in Canaan Street. Officially the Volunteer Arms, this was built as a two-storey private house of local grey stone and is still in the same family ownership since it became a pub in 1879. The main bar at the front of the building has an old bar counter and back gantry. On the front left is a tiny area but there is no indication it was ever a separate small snug. In the early 1960s, the rooms at the front were partially opened-up and a second counter added at the rear right. A couple of small rooms have also been brought into use. This quirky pub sells its own blended whisky and over 200 single malt whiskies; it even has a champagne menu. When not busy, drinks are occasionally served on a tray with some complimentary peanuts - the prices reflect this.

Linlithgow

179 High Street, Linlithgow, EH49 7EN

Tel: (01506) 844434

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

Crown Arms ✰

Crown Arms, Linlithgow

Public Bar

Early 19th-century, small town pub with a little-altered bar and a small pool room. The tiny jug bar on the left is no longer separated, following the removal of the partition in c.1980, but the colourful window glass was retained and is now re-sited at the rear of the bar. Both the back gantry, with a large 'Wm Braithwaite' mirror as a centre feature, and the wood-panelled walls with benches attached could be 100 years old. The bar counter has been replaced, possibly 30-odd years ago, but it retains an old set of disused handpumps and a water tap. There are two large brewery mirrors advertising 'Bernard’s Pale Ale', and one for \John Jeffrey’s Mild & Pale Ales' situated over the fireplace, and another for Mitchell Whisky. The inner doors have 'Crown' and 'Bar' on colourful glass panels. At the rear of the bar up a small flight of steps is a pool room, which has been brought into use in recent years.

Mid Calder

Market Street, Mid Calder, EH53 0AA

Tel: (01506) 882170

Email: blackbullmidcalder@sky.com

Website: http://www.blackbullmidcalder.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon & Tue; 11-Midnight Wed & Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12.30-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12(12.30 Sun) - 8.45)

Listed Status: Grade C

Black Bull ✰

Black Bull, Mid Calder

Public Bar 1

An 18th-century pub where the small public bar on the right is barely altered in 60 years. Dating from this time are the counter and a back gantry comprising two similar sections each of three bays with mirrors. There is old tongue-and-groove wall and ceiling panelling and a tiled and cast fireplace with good mirrored mantelpiece. The bar is open evenings only during the week. Behind the servery is a former snug with old dado panelling and some old fixed seating; this is now used as the office. The passageway near the snug has full height panelled walls; the doorway to the gents' has two old advertising panels and an old 'Urinal' enamel plate above. The large lounge is all modern.

Musselburgh

10 Ravensheugh Road, Musselburgh, EH21 7PP

Directions: B1348, 1m E of centre

Tel: (0131) 665 3220

Email: levenhallarms@gmail.com

Website:

Opening Hours: 12 - 11(midnight Thu; 1am Fri & Sat); 12.30 - Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Levenhall Arms ✰

Levenhall Arms, Musselburgh

Public Bar

Three-roomed pub on the east side of town close to the racecourse and popular with locals and racegoers. Formerly a coaching inn dating back to 1830 it was refitted in 1953 and is little changed since. The bar on the left retains its lapped wood counter, mirrored gantry, beauty board panelled walls and two stone fireplaces now with radiators in front. There is a separate small games room at the rear. The lounge on the right, which was formerly two small rooms and a snug, has a gantry added in 1953 and a bar counter and fixed seating in the 1970s.

Musselburgh

81 North High St., Musselburgh, EH21 6JE

Directions: behind The Brunton

Tel: (0131) 665 9654

Email: finlaynigel@gmail.com

Website: http://www.staggsbar.com

Opening Hours: 12-11 Mon-Wed; 12-11.30 Thu; 12-Midnight Fri; 11-Midnight Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Volunteer Arms [Staggs] ✰

Volunteer Arms [Staggs], Musselburgh

Servery

Built 1858, licensed 1860, and in same family ever since, it has a barely altered main bar with panelled walls and segmented ceiling. The late Victorian gantry with four huge spirit casks is an unusual survivor. The right-hand door led to the jug bar but this has been removed and a half door inscribed ‘Jug Bar’ moved to the main inner doors. There are glazed baffles to the seating, old window screens, and a couple of advertising mirrors. Beyond the bar is a lounge which once comprised two tiny snugs. A rear lounge was added post-war and refitted in the early 1990s.

Newtongrange

80 Main Street, Newtongrange, EH22 4NA

Tel: (0131) 663 2419

Email: manager@deantavern.co.uk

Website: http://www.deantavern.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon; 9-11 Tue-Thu; 9-Midnight Fri & Sat; 10-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Newtongrange) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (9am-8)

Listed Status: Grade C

Dean Tavern ✰

Dean Tavern, Newtongrange

Servery

One of only five pubs in Scotland still operating on the 'Gothenburg' principle. This multi-roomed pub with a massive public bar has been carefully modernised over the years. It was rebuilt in 1910. The public bar has three arched pillars supporting the roof in the centre of the room so it looks like two high-ceilinged rooms with a U-shaped counter protruding from the left-hand wall.

Prestonpans

227 High St., Prestonpans, EH32 9BE

Directions: W edge of town

Tel: (01875) 819922

Email: sean@kentwoodbrewing.com

Website:

Opening Hours: Closed Mon; 12-2.30 Tue; 12-2.30, 5-11 Wed; 11-11 Thu & Fri; 11-Midnight Sat; 11-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-2.30 Tue & Wed; 12-2.30, 5.30-7.30 Thu; 12-9 Fri & Sat; 12.30-7.30 Sun)

Listed Status: Grade B

Prestoungrange Gothenburg ★

Prestoungrange Gothenburg, Prestonpans

Public Bar

This superb pub was built in 1908 for the East of Scotland Public Houses Trust, in Arts and Crafts style. It was sold to the London-based Trust Houses Ltd in 1919 and, after a chequered late 20th-century history, reopened following meticulous restoration in 2003 which won that year’s CAMRA national conservation award. The public bar is a magnificent room with superbly designed features – low segmental arches at the sides, wall panelling and rich green Art Nouveau tiling. It has a servery in the centre which would form an island but for the tiny jug bar which joins it to the front entrance. To the left is an elegantly panelled lounge/café where the emphasis is on dining rather than drinking. A tiled spiral staircase leads to the upper floor where the historic features are limited to two fine fireplaces. The building has been extended at the rear to include a small brewery (opened 2004). The name comes from the Gothenburg System – still operating here – which originated in the Swedish city in 1865 to encourage temperance. Managers gained no benefit from alcohol sales but did so from food and non-alcoholic drinks. Profits above a certain percentage (usually 5%, as here) were devoted to projects for the benefit of the community. Here they go to the Prestoungrange Arts Festival which has funded the wall and ceiling paintings at the pub and other art works in the community.

Tranent

131 Church Street, Tranent, EH33 1BL

Tel: (01875) 610200

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11 - 11(midnight Fri & Sun; 12.45am Sat)

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Tower Inn ✰

Tower Inn, Tranent

Servery

A single-storey terracotta stone pub built 1902 and still with a lot of original fittings in the stand-up bar. It has a splendid three-bay back gantry incorporating a large 'Livingstone's Malt Whisky' mirror in the centre. The pub has been subject to two significant refurbishments. Shortly after long-serving licensee James Inglis took over in 1948, a jug bar and snug on the right were removed, the long bar counter shortened and some ply panelling added to the walls of the bar. In addition, a lounge, complete with a new small counter and gantry, was created in the room on the left. New owners in 2002 refurbished the lounge and removed the 1950s bar counter and gantry. There is a good collection of brewery and whisky mirrors.

West Calder

43 Main St., West Calder, EH55 8DL

Tel: (01506) 871691

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri-Sat; 12-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (West Calder) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Railway Inn ★

Railway Inn, West Calder

Interior

Built around 1900, this little-altered archetypal Scottish town bar with has extensive original fittings in the form of a U-shaped bar counter, disused (but intact) jug bar with hatch as you enter, and delicate island gantry (effectively in two parts with an arched walk-through central section). The dado panelling is original; the large Teacher's 'Celebrated Whiskies' mirror could be 100 years old but the seating and floor covering are new. Carrying on down the passage on the right and you will find a large, plain lounge at the rear, also with old dado panelling. Visit the gents', if you can, for the mightily impressive marble urinal, tiled dado and red tiled floor.

Fife

Kincardine

16 Forth Street, Kincardine, FK10 4LX

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Railway Tavern ★

Railway Tavern, Kincardine

Public Bar

At the end of a row of cottages, this small, friendly pub is an amazing survivor. 200 years ago it is thought to have served drovers bringing their livestock south to market. Until the coming of the railway in 1893, it was called the Ferry, which related to a crossing on the Forth about 100 yards away, taking people across to Higgins Neuk. The lettering above the door – ‘J Dobie Licensee’ – is the only outward sign that this is a pub. It refers to Janet Dobie, the mother of Ronnie Dobie, the present, fourth-generation owner. Three rooms are in public use (a fourth is now a store), all very simply appointed. Two of them have working bell-pushes connected to an annunciator box in the corridor. Here also are the remnants, in the ceiling, of what are said to be hooks from which drovers slung their hammocks. On the left is the public bar, one of the smallest in Scotland: the seating consists of metal framed seats originally constructed by Alexanders, bus builders of Falkirk. Listed in 2008 as a result of survey work by CAMRA.

Kirkcaldy

28 Bogies Wynd, Kirkcaldy, KY1 2PH

Tel: (01592) 205577

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11.30-midnight

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade A

Feuars Arms ★

Feuars Arms, Kirkcaldy

Public Bar

A splendid example of Edwardian pub fitting and especially notable for the display of ceramics, one of the best in Scotland, including an 18 metre (59 feet) long bar counter completely fronted with brown Art Nouveau-style tiles. The pub was rebuilt in 1890 and then remodelled in 1902 by William Williamson with two-tone tiled walls, including two small Doulton’s of Lambeth tiled panels (each a large single tile) featuring a jester evidently eyeing up the shepherdess a few feet away. The figure is the same as Touchstone at the St James Tavern, Soho, London W1.

Kirkcaldy

471-475 High Street, Kirkcaldy, KY1 2SN

Tel: (01592) 264270

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 5-Midnight Mon & Tue; 11-3, 5-Midnight Wed; 11-Midnight Thu-Sat; 12-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale and Real Cider

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Kirkcaldy) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Harbour Bar ✰

Harbour Bar, Kirkcaldy

Jug Bar

The building dates from c.1870 and was a ship's chandlers until it became a pub in 1924; it is one of few pubs still with a jug bar. In the porch, doors lead to the bar on the right, lounge on the left and in front of you is the tiny intact jug bar with its two half-width doors and two tiny hatches to the bar. The main bar on the right retains its original mirrored back gantry with fluted pilasters, bar counter and half-height panelled walls. At the rear is an area created during a 1960s flat roof extension to the building. Lounge on the left has no old fittings apart from the panelled ceiling with decorative plasterwork of thistles, roses and clover. Behind the pub is the Fyfe brewery established in 1995.

Greater Glasgow & Clyde Valley

Auldhouse

12 Langlands Road, Auldhouse, G75 9DW

Tel: (01355) 263242

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Grade C

Auldhouse Arms ✰

Auldhouse Arms, Auldhouse

Interior

A 200-year-old single storey village pub that has expanded in recent years but retains, little changed, its original public bar and two-sitting-room core. The public bar has a splendid quarter-circle gantry, with four upright spirit barrels, that probably dates from the 1920s. The curved bar counter, with a noticeable slope on the left side, and the floor-to-ceiling match-board panelling are also from the 1920s, but the quarry tiled floor is new. A tiny shop to the right was absorbed into the pub in the 1970s and is now a snug with the pub entrance moved from the centre of the public bar to the right. The panelled rear snug has old mirrors and basic bench seating.

Bishopbriggs

130 Kirkintolloch Road, Bishopbriggs, G64 2LT

Tel: (0141) 762 0655

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Bishopbriggs)

Listed Status: Not listed

Quin's Bar ✰

Quin

Servery

Large basic, high-ceilinged Edwardian bar with a small snug. The public bar has an attractive pedimented back gantry with mirrored panels, a clock and some modern additions. The original bar counter has lost its spittoon trough and there are four columns with ornate capitals picked out in gold. A sitting room on the left was absorbed into the bar by removal of part of the adjoining wall in the late 1990s. On the right hand side of the pub is the separate family department, which was in operation until 1994 and is now a snug with old seating.

Bothwell

1-3 Main Street, Bothwell, G71 8RD

Tel: (01698) 850888

Email: info@camphillvaults.co.uk

Website: http://www.rivarestaurants.com/camphill/about.html

Opening Hours: 11-midnight; 11-1am Fri; 12-midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Blantyre) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Grade C

Camphill Vaults ✰

Camphill Vaults, Bothwell

Servery

A red sandstone-built pub dating from about 1900. The public bar retains most of its original fittings, including a decoratively carved quarter-circle bar counter and a splendid high L-shaped back gantry made of rosewood, linked by an arch in the corner; it is pleasing to see that the lower shelves of the gantry remain intact and a new fridge has been placed within the servery instead of replacing shelving, as usually happens. Judging from the photograph taken 70 years ago that hangs in the bar, the only change has been the removal of small spirit casks and the replacement of the clock. The 'Family Department' room has Victorian ceilings, a fireplace, and an unusual flap allowing staff access behind the counter.

Glasgow, Charing Cross

129 St. Georges Road, Glasgow, G3 6JA

Directions: corner of Carnarvon Street

Tel: (0141) 332 5125

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Carnarvon Bar ✰

Carnarvon Bar, Glasgow Charing Cross

Public Bar

This dimly-lit island-style bar that was subject to a sympathetic refurbishment in 2004 which left the layout and fittings much as they have been for many years. It retains the original Edwardian island bar counter, an old island gantry, three snugs, and the panelling was repainted and fixed seating renewed. A fourth snug situated on the front right was lost many years ago and then in 2012 the snug on the front left was removed leaving only two. The ladies' toilets in the rear right were only added in recent years. Cast-iron pillars support the high-coffered ceiling with good cornice work but the quarry tiled floor is modern.

Glasgow, City Centre

17 - 19 Drury Street, Glasgow, G2 5AE

Tel: (0141) 248 6368

Email:

Website: https://www.thehorseshoebarglasgow.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-midnight

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Glasgow Central) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Grade A

Horse Shoe ★

Horse Shoe, Glasgow City Centre

Island Bar Interior

Something of a Glasgow institution, the Horse Shoe is one of the finest examples of Scotland’s Victorian island-bar pubs. It was built in 1870 and remodelled in 1885–7 by publican John Scouller, then again in 1901, when the partitions between sitting rooms and the bar were removed. The horse-shoe motif is said to derive from the fact that Scouller was a keen equestrian. At just over 104 ft round the outer circumference, the counter is the second longest in the UK after the Falcon at Clapham Junction, London, which weighs in at a mighty 125ft. The initials ‘JYW’ in glazed screens on the counter and elsewhere refer to John Young Whyte, who succeeded Scouller in 1923. The main island gantry includes eight spirit casks ends on their sides (used until the 1930s) with, unusually, two taps in each. There is a second, small circular gantry with a marble shelf but its top seems modern. On the side walls there are two horseshoe-shaped fireplaces: the similar features on the rear wall seem to have always been just ornamental. At the front is a clock with the twelve letters of ‘The Horse Shoe’ instead of numbers. The panelled walls have large bell-pushes towards the rear, mostly set in decorative panels. The skylight at the rear right was added in 1985. Listing upgraded to A in 2008 as a result of survey work by CAMRA.

Glasgow, City Centre

112-114 Stockwell Street, Glasgow, G1 4LW

Tel: (0141) 552 8681

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-Midnight Mon-Sat; 12.30-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Argyle Street) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (11-11 Mon-Sat; Closed Sun)

Listed Status: Not listed

Scotia Bar ✰

Scotia Bar, Glasgow City Centre

Public Bar

First licensed in 1815, this pub is famous for a folk music tradition started in the early 1960s, the most famous artist to appear here being the Glasgow legend Billy Connolly. The mock-Tudor frontage and a number of fittings date from a refurbishment in 1929. The bar counter has the old terrazzo spittoon trough around the base and match strikers all along the top; there is a mirrored back gantry and a part-glazed partition on the left, which creates a separate small bar. Following a period of closure, the pub was refurbished by Brendan McLaughlin in 1987, which is the date of the rear section of the back gantry, the short partitions and panelled walls. On the right, another partition creates a tiny snug on two levels, and there are signs of a another snug at the front where some bell-pushes remain.

Glasgow, City Centre

Argyll Arcade, Glasgow, G2 8AG

Directions: Off Argyll Street via Argyll Arcade (normal shopping hours only) or via Morrisons Court (lane between Argyll St & Buchanan St).

Tel: (0141) 221 8886

Email: info@sloansglasgow.com

Website: http://www.sloansglasgow.com/

Opening Hours: 11:00-24:00 Mon-Thu; 11:00-01:00 Fri & Sat; 11:00-24:00 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Argyle Street) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12:00-22:00)

Listed Status: Grade A

Sloans ✰

Sloans, Glasgow City Centre

First Floor Corridor

An early 19 century courtyard building, the interior was remodelled in 1900 by Charles H Robinson, a specialist in ornate bar interiors, the rich decorative scheme being commissioned by David Sloan, a prominent Glasgow publican of the era. The entrance from the adjacent Argyle Arcade is a vestibule and staircase of exceptional quality with patterned tiles and dado. The ornate timber staircase continues with mosaic floor, panelling and wall-painting to the magnificent upper floors. Here is a series of rooms with beautiful timber partitions and elaborate ceilings; note that these rooms are not regularly open. The large ground floor bar is all modern in restrained Edwardian style, but has a good island counter and central gantry.

Glasgow, City Centre

62 Glassford Street, Glasgow, G1 1UP

Tel: (0141) 552 2283

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

Steps Bar ★

Steps Bar, Glasgow City Centre

Public Bar

This is one of Glasgow’s two well preserved Art Deco pubs, refitted by new owners, the Taylor family, in 1949. The frontage is clad in Vitrolite panelling and has frosted glass windows (one replaced in 2006). The interior is gloriously complete with veneer-panelled walls, and original gantry and counter. There is a small sitting room on the left with more panelling, fixed seating and bell-pushes. Here a stained glass panel window depicts the Cunard liner RMS Queen Mary, launched on the Clyde in 1936: a Spitfire flies above, no doubt the choice of Thomas Taylor who had flown with Coastal Command and Transport Command in the war. It is said that much of the woodwork was a mock-up of part of the Queen Mary displayed at the huge 1938 Empire Exhibition in Glasgow and was stored during the war by a firm of builders known to the Taylors, although the official programme for the exhibition makes no mention of, or advertisement for such an exhibit. The only changes have been the replacement of floor coverings, the new gents’ at the rear and the addition of a 1950s ladies’ for the first time.

Glasgow, Govan

803 Govan Road, Glasgow, G51 3DJ

Tel: (0141) 445 1349

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

Brechin's ★

Brechin

Island Bar

This fine building dates from 1894 when it opened as the Cardell Hall, named after John Cardell who used it as the local headquarters for the Rechabites, a charitable organisation which espoused the virtues of Temperance. Ironically, now a pub, it has a very interesting, intact spacious interior of about 1960 which features a late example of the Scottish island-servery. This is mostly surrounded by the roomy public bar with ply-panelled walls and fixed bench seating in the alcoves but at the back there is also a screened-off lounge area with a hatch to the servery and red leatherette-covered bench seating. Upstairs is a former lounge, now used as a function room with panelled walls and a hooped stall for waiters. High up on the south side outside is a carving of the legendary Govan Cat, famed for its stupendous rat-exterminating abilities

Glasgow, Govan

1-3 Paisley Road West, Glasgow, G51 1LF

Tel: (0141) 258 4830

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11; 11-midnight Fri&Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Anderston) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

Old Toll Bar ★

Old Toll Bar, Glasgow Govan

Interior

Glasgow's finest pub interior, situated in the ground floor of a three-storey tenement built in 1860 and remodelled in 1892-3. One hundred years ago, there were many ornate pubs like this throughout the city, as publicans went to great lengths to outshine their competitors at a time when skilled labour was cheap. This is one of the last remaining Victorian 'palace pubs' in Glasgow; sadly, similar interiors have been ripped out in recent times only to be replaced by poorer quality modern fittings. The large bar has a magnificent dark wooden back gantry incorporating two sets of four whisky casks either side of a mirrored centrepiece, a pediment and central clock. There was a tier of smaller barrels in the recess below the large barrels but they were removed some time ago. The original long bar counter with some part glazed short partitions has a new polished stone top.

Glasgow, Govan

22 Paisley Road West, Glasgow, G51 1LB

Tel: (0141) 429 0665

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Exhibition Centre (Glasgow)) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Viceroy ✰

Viceroy, Glasgow Govan

Island Bar

Single storey building with an island bar interior from the inter-war period with some post-war embellishments. The island bar counter has a terrazzo trough all around the base and the top appears old with banks of founts. The island gantry looks inter-war.

Glasgow, Shettleston

1169 Shettleston Road, Glasgow, G32 7NB

Tel: (0141) 778 6657

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

Portland Arms ★

Portland Arms, Glasgow Shettleston

Island Bar Interior

The most intact Art Deco pub interior in Britain and also a good example of Scotland’s island bar pubs. Rebuilt in 1938, it is a single storey structure designed by architects Thomas Sandilands & Macleod for a family that held it until 2006. In front of the entrance is a three sided lobby with a disused ‘Family Dept’ (off-sales) where service was via a small opening in a glazed panel. To the left of the entrance is a small office (now a store). The centrepiece at the Portland, however, is the main bar with its central servery, with banded veneer counter, whose oval shape is matched by the canopy above, all with smooth detail that is so typical of the 1930s. It has a central gantry with the top part supported on chrome-plated tubing. The original fixed seating has wooden dividers and match strikers on them (match strikers also appear on the bar counter). Each corner of the pub has a small snug: that at the front right is particularly interesting as being named as ‘Ladies Room’ in the door glass and has a ladies’ toilet leading off it. The only major changes since 1938 are the replacement of the floor covering and modernisation of the toilets. This is a popular drinkers’ pub which gets packed when Celtic are playing at home, and is regularly used by film companies for period dramas.

Glasgow, Shettleston

1410-1416 Shettleston Road, Glasgow, G32 9AL

Tel: (0141) 778 2368

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Railway Tavern ★

Railway Tavern, Glasgow Shettleston

Interior

The exterior may not look much but this is a welcoming corner-site local. It has a substantially intact Edwardian interior with a typically Glasgow island-bar arrangement, probably laid out after the pub was taken over by the Neilson family in 1903. The right-hand door leads into a self-contained ‘family department’. The main entrance is on the left and has a small vestibule inside. There is a narrow bar fronting the road and to the right of this is an L-shaped drinking area running round the servery. On the far left are a couple of sitting rooms and between them an annunciator box with three discs, which suggest there was originally an extra sitting room, now taken by the ladies’ toilet. In the middle of the servery is a low island gantry with a couple of drawers for takings, predating the advent of the electronic till. There appears to have been a refit in the post-war period, whence the mosaic floor and the loss of doors.

Glasgow, Strathbungo

708 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow, G41 2AD

Tel: (0141) 423 0380

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Heraghty's Bar ✰

Heraghty

Public Bar

Small Edwardian drinkers' pub with an elegant carved back gantry that is adorned with mirrors, columns and decorative capitals. The bar counter, which has modern tiles around the base, was installed in the 1930s, which is the date of the Art Deco glass. Other original fittings include a large column in the middle of the room, with a number of now redundant match strikers, a modest frieze around the walls, and old panelling on the walls. The fixed seating looks at least 30 years old, while the ladies' toilet was only installed in 1996 following complaints!

Glasgow, Tradeston

58 Bridge Street, Glasgow, G5 9HU

Tel: (0141) 429 4528

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11:00-23:00; 12:30-23:00 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Glasgow Central) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade C

Laurieston Bar ★

Laurieston Bar, Glasgow Tradeston

Lounge

This small, friendly pub has one of the most remarkable interiors in the UK. It is the most intact example of pub-building (in fact remodelling) from about 1960 and is, thus, as important as a great Victorian pub – only very much rarer. Behind what is, frankly, an unprepossessing exterior with its black and white mosaic and distinctive lettering, traces of the Victorian building survive in three iron columns, the floor tiling in the gents and the lower parts of the central gantry. But back to modernity – facing the Bridge Street entrance is a small intact off-sales, either side of which are the lounge (right) and public bar. The latter has fixed seating, a series of narrow, two-tiered fixed Formica tables and contemporary low chairs. The boarded bar counter (with Formica top) is a fairly simple affair, not unlike work of the 1930s, but the suspended structure over it and the ceiling panelling are quintessential 1960s work. There’s even an original heated glass food display unit on the counter. The lounge is a touch smarter, with more fixed seating, carpeting, panelling and a number of bell-pushes for service. To complete the picture, Formica covers the walls in the loos.

Gourock

64 - 65 Shore Street, Gourock, PA19 1RF

Tel: (01475) 632042

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Gourock)

Listed Status: Not listed

Monteiths ✰

Monteiths, Gourock

Public Bar

Small drinkers pub built in the 1890s that retains its original seven-tier back gantry and U-shaped bar counter. The public bar has good cornice-work and two old mirrors but the panelling and seating areas date from 1990s. The rear sitting room with '2' on the door has some fixed seating, which is possibly inter-war. Originally, the left hand door led to a ladies' snug but the partition was removed some years ago - its position was where the terrazzo trough around the base of the bar finishes. Look for the stuck-on lettering high up in the right hand porch advertising 'Campbell's Edinburgh Ales' and various spirits.

Gourock

1 Victoria Bar Hopeton Street, Gourock, PA19 1PG

Tel: (01475) 633152

Email: victoriabar.paisley@belhavenpubs.net

Website: http://www.victoriabar-gourock.co.uk/

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Wed; 11-midnight Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 11-midnight Sun

Listed Status: Grade C

Victoria Bar ✰

Victoria Bar, Gourock

Interior

This local institution has a stand-up bar for drinkers and a popular modernised lounge on the left. In a 19th-century building, it has an island style bar of c.1900. A porch on the right side has three doors, two of which lead to the terrazzo-floor bar; the other was for the off-sales but this now leads to a service area. The original counter has a trough around the base, and the gantry was replaced in 1993, although it is a true replica of the original. The lounge on the left was opened-up in 1990 and extended back, and there is a restaurant on the first floor with a separate entrance. There are very few optics, with most spirits being served from the bottle into measures.

Greenock

7 Laird Street, Greenock, PA15 1LB

Tel: (01475) 720028

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (West)

Listed Status: Not listed

Black Cat Bar ✰

Black Cat Bar, Greenock

Public Bar

Town centre locals' pub of classic island bar-style with only a narrow area around it for drinkers. Apart from repainting, it has remained much as it is today for over 50 years. It retains an island counter at least 70 years old, with a replacement top, and a modest island gantry. The porch has a terrazzo floor which is also the material used for the old spittoon trough around the bar. There is a good cornice and the whole room has old dado panelling. The only significant change in the past 50 years is the adding of a ladies' toilet. Popular with Celtic fans.

Hamilton

289 Glasgow Road, Burnbank, Hamilton, ML3 0QG

Directions: corner of Glemlee Street

Tel: 01698 307310

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Empire Bar ✰

Empire Bar, Hamilton

Island Bar Interior

A basic urban pub built 1907 in classic island bar-style. It retains its original island bar counter with short partitions and some front panels that were added in the 1980s. The dividing strips, ornamented with a badge and a diamond, are original: the Formica bar top is new, and running just underneath all the way along it is a match-striker. The original two-part island gantry has a modern top section. The old vestibule entrance on the Glenlee Street side has three doors, one of which originally led to the family department. There is a shallow vestibule on the Glasgow Road side entrance. The two open sitting rooms on the left look little altered since the 1930s; the small lounge at the rear is now a store room.

Larkhall

3-5 London Road, Larkhall, ML9 1AQ

Tel: (01698) 883463

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Village Tavern ✰

Village Tavern, Larkhall

Island Bar Interior

A popular drinkers' pub in a late 19th-century sandstone building, last fitted out during inter-war times in island-bar style. The counter has ribbed panels apart from the front section, which may indicate the loss of a jug and bottle. The modest island gantry with space for staff to walk through the central part has an old till drawer that was in use up to 2000. There are wood-panelled walls to picture-frame height all around; fixed, slatted benches; a 1920s-style tiled and wood surround fireplace; two old brewery mirrors, and Murray's window screens and a decorative cornice. The partitioned area in the far right corner is a spirits cupboard, and has a '5' on the door. There were two tiny snugs at the rear but both are now used for storage. Some customers still get table service on a shout of 'Hoy'.

Paisley

18 Moss Street, Paisley, PA1 1BL

Tel: (0141) 889 2742

Email: manager@brewerstap.co.uk

Website: http://brewerstap.co.uk/

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri&Sat; 11-8 Sun

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Paisley Gilmour Street) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Brewers Tap ✰

Brewers Tap, Paisley

Interior

It retains its original island bar counter with a ply panelled front. The island gantry is long and narrow with two parts of three bays each and a narrow walkway for staff to cross to the other counter. It is good to see that fridges have been placed under the counter leaving lower gantry shelving intact. Over the rear of the island bar is a stained and leaded glass skylight. In the rear area there are another three modest stained and leaded skylights. The floor is of red tiles laid diagonally with a white terrazzo border / trough all around the base of the counter. On the left and right walls there are impressive large 1930s brick fireplaces of a size not seen in any pub that we are aware of.

Paisley

7 New Street, Paisley, PA1 1XU

Tel: (0141) 849 0472

Email: bullinn.paisley@stonegatepubs.com

Website: http://www.greatukpubs.co.uk/bullinnpaisley

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 11-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Paisley Gilmour Street) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade A

Bull Inn ★

Bull Inn, Paisley

Public Bar

Although not as well known as the best historic pubs of Edinburgh or Glasgow, the Bull has one of Scotland’s finest and most interesting pub interiors. It was rebuilt in 1901 to designs by a local architect, W.D. McLennan (1872–1940) who takes up the modern, inventive architecture we associate with his great contemporary, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The (disused) narrow, right-hand door at the entrance leads to a tiny, intact former off-sales compartment. The front window has stained glass with attractive flowing designs and the interior has a decidedly Art Nouveau flavour.. The panelled public bar has an impressive gantry down the right-hand side housing a series of spirit casks. It also retains four sets of quadruple spirit cocks, a rare survival of draught spirit dispense. Over the counter is the unusual device of six arched service areas. Moving back, there is a glazed partition behind which are three delightful glazed snugs, one still with its door: the glazing to these spaces appears to be a modern replacement (it is quite different and less substantial from that elsewhere in the pub). New toilets have replaced two snugs which used to lead off the top-lit area at the rear and which is characterised by highly individual, attenuated detailing.

Renton

123 Main Street, Renton, G82 4NL

Directions: On the B857

Tel: (01389) 752088

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Alexandria)

Listed Status: Grade B

Central Bar ★

Central Bar, Renton

Public Bar

Built in 1893, this down-to-earth drinkers’ pub occupies the ground floor of a two-storey tenement. Behind the rather rundown frontage is an interesting interior. The panelled bar has a sweeping semi-circular counter and an elaborate ceiling and cornices. The gantry against the side wall houses spirit casks in each of its four bays: unusually, each has two taps and must be divided internally. There is also a free-standing central gantry within the servery for bottles, glasses etc. Opposite is a lovely mirror advertising Old Oak Tree whisky. On the left is an intact but disused jug and bottle compartment. At the rear were two sitting rooms (it seems that once there were two more on the right) both opened up to the bar: the left one has slatted seating but that to the right was recently opened out, and is devoid of seating.

Shotts

82 Shottskirk Road, Shotts, ML7 4EP

Tel: 01501 822416

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Old Wine Store ✰

Old Wine Store, Shotts

Whisky Casks

This edge-of-town pub with a stand up drinkers' bar is possibly the only one in Scotland still selling whisky from the barrel. Situated in a building dated 1927 it has a U-shaped bar counter and island gantry, which are believed to have come from the original Old Wine Store pub situated 100 yards up the road. The splendid island gantry has four tall upright casks and the third one on the left is still in use and dispenses Whyte & McKay's Blended Whisky. Note the tiny 'Doctor's Special' mirror on the lower end of the gantry and the small till drawer. The pub still retains a working off-sales on the left but the partition that separates it from the bar has been replaced in recent years. On the right side of the room are some new low partitions and fixed seating. Up to 2003 this area consisted of three tiny snugs. The games room at the rear is a conversion of a former ground floor cellar. The ladies' toilet was added in the 1970s.

Uddingston

60 Old Mill Road, Uddingston, G71 7PF

Tel: (01698) 812678

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 12-11

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Uddingston) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Grade B

Rowan Tree ✰

Rowan Tree, Uddingston

Bar

An early 19th-century, single-storey building, remodelled in 1902–3. It retains its old long bar counter (on which are two working water taps), carved gantry with impressive mirrors and two small, glazed cigar cabinets, Victorian fireplaces, bench seating, wood-panelled walls and ceiling. The centrally placed jug and bottle and its two partition walls were removed in about 1980, unfortunately, thus creating a single space. The pub has a pair of smart sitting rooms of 1970s on either side of the historic core.

Wishaw

121 Main Street, Wishaw, ML2 7AU

Tel: 01698 372320

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Imperial Bar ✰

Imperial Bar, Wishaw

Row of Snugs

This town centre drinkers' pub is most interesting for its layout, with a series of four snugs along the left-hand side which were probably mostly installed a decade or so after the Second World War. They have high sides and three of them are just large enough to accommodate a table and seats around three sides. The back gantry, which is modern, and bar counter are arranged on the right-hand side, parallel to the snugs.

Highlands & Western Isles

Fortrose

29 High Street, Fortrose, IV10 8SX

Directions: In Fortrose on A832

OSRef: NH72495651

Tel: (01381) 620346

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11 Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri; 11-11.45 Sat; 12.30-11 Sun

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Union Tavern ✰

Union Tavern, Fortrose

Bar Counter

The single bar had a refitting in the late 1950s or early 1960s and has changed little since with two-thirds height panelled walls of a distinctive 1950’s style, which is also on the bar counter front. The gantry has shelves held up by columns on a mirrored backing (fortunately a fridge sits in the servery area so loss of lower bar back shelves). There is also a 1950s brick fireplace. In c.2000 it was crudely opened-up to the rear. Good exterior windows and etched panels on inner doors.

Inverness

106-110 Academy Street, Inverness, IV1 1LX

Directions: 150 m West from the bus station

OSRef: NH66464554

Tel: (01463) 240300

Email:

Website: http://www.phoenixalehouse.co.uk/

Opening Hours: 11-Midnight Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Inverness) and Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-9pm)

Listed Status: Grade B

Phoenix Ale House ✰

Phoenix Ale House, Inverness

Island Bar Interior

Built in 1894, the spartan public bar is of classic Scottish island bar-style. It is much as it was, with the original island counter, a terrazzo spittoon trough running all the way around the base and three disused Dalex tall fonts. However the island gantry was replaced in 1983. The shallow vestibule has curved, etched side windows and 'Push' on the inner door panels. The floor pattern could indicate a partition that divided the drinking space in two. The water engine used to raise the beer from the cellar has been converted to electric power and can be seen in an illuminated case high up on the rear wall of the bar. In the 1980s the pub expanded into the property on the right and, apart from a ceiling rose, the lounge, 'Morgan's', has no old fittings.

Rosemarkie

48 High Street, Rosemarkie, IV10 8UF

Directions: Follow the A832 through Fortrose and Rosemarkie.

OSRef: NH736577

Tel: (01381) 620164

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-Midnight Mon-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12-Midnight Sun; Winter Closed Mon; 11-Midnight Tue-Thu; 11-1am Fri & Sat; 12-Midnight Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-3, 5-8 Mon-Sat; 12.30-3, 5-8 Sun; Winter Closed Mon; 12-3, 5-8 Tue-Sat; 12.30-3, 5-8 Sun)

Listed Status: Grade C

Plough Inn ★

Plough Inn, Rosemarkie

Public Bar

A small pub rebuilt in 1907 (as a stone inscription above the entrance explains) with a delightfully fitted-out, virtually intact front room. This has its original semi-circular counter and simple gantry. The room is entirely panelled and also has a tongue-and-groove boarded ceiling. Attached to the right-hand side of the servery is a small office for the publican, now used for storage. The fireplace has a huge lintel dated 1691 but his is a replica in cast iron dating from 1907 of a marriage stone. Such stones usually comprised a lintel such as this with the initials etc. of a newly married couple. Above is a large, vintage Dewar’s Perth Whisky mirror. The infill of the fireplace and tiled floor are later features.

Stornoway

32 Point Street, Stornoway, HS1 2XF

OSRef: NB422328

Tel: (01851) 701990

Email: I.Mackillop@btopenworld.com

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11; closed Sun

Public Transport: Near Bus Stop

Listed Status: Not listed

Criterion Bar ✰

Criterion Bar, Stornoway

Public Bar

Small single bar with a narrow frontage that is the only pub or hotel in the Western Isles with an historic interior. It was refitted in the 1930s and retains the bar counter which curves at the left / front end. The gantry mostly dates from the 1930s but the third bay has some modern tiling. A couple of fridges have replaced lower bar back shelves. There is 1930s dado paneling around the room and fixed seating which may date from the 1930s but has been re-covered in modern times. The window screen looks modern and frosted ‘Bar’ glass in the two inner doors looks replacements. Toilets were modernised in c.2000.

Loch Lomond, Stirling & The Trossachs

Falkirk

76 High Station Road, Falkirk, FK1 5QX

Tel: (01324) 632454

Email:

Website:

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Listed Status: Not listed

Woodside Inn ✰

Woodside Inn, Falkirk

Bar

A popular stand-up drinkers' pub built 1898 with a U-shaped original counter that takes up an incredible amount of space compared to the size of the room. The vestibule entrance has doors with colourful 'Bar' windows to the left and right, but nowadays you enter via the half doors with 'Family Bar' panels in front of you. In the late 1980s, the two partition walls that formed the off-sales were removed to create a completely walk-around bar. The panelled walls are original, as are the Victorian tiled fireplace and the bench seating opposite, but the island gantry was replaced in 2003 and other seating renewed. Other original features include a large frieze of Fleur-de-lys and thistles all around the room, two large Geo. Younger's mirrors, and another for Highland Queen whisky.

Falkirk, Grahamston

150 Grahams Road, Falkirk, FK2 7BY

Tel: (01324) 633303

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Star ✰

Star, Falkirk Grahamston

Public Bar

This 1930s Art Deco drinkers' pub is well worth a visit to see what may be the only glass bar counter in the country, made up of some 160 ribbed glass segments and with a wooden top. The 1930s fittings include a good set of front windows and diagonal door handles. The back gantry has a base, which could date from the 1930s, with a series of drawers, and a top part of sunken shelving with some glass shelves added in the late 1950s. The walls have full height panelling; there is a 1950s brick fireplace in the opened-up area on the right, and all the fixed seating looks of a similar age. A door from Gowan Street leads into a passage that has an intact off-sales hatch with its two sliding windows. In the gents toilet the WC did have a working penny in the slot on the door until recently but this now resides on the wall of the lounge upstairs, which has a post-war bar counter, new bar top and new shelves for a gantry.

Tayside

Alyth

37 Airlie St., Alyth, PH11 8AJ

Tel: (01828) 633913

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11.30-11

Listed Status: Not listed

Airlie Street bar ✰

Airlie Street bar, Alyth

Glazed Screen

Stone and rendered terrace pub which was given an inter-war refit of which much remains in the public bar and passage with off sales. The entrance has an inter-war vestibule and there is passage created by a part glazed partition wall on the right and which has some fielded panelling on the front left wall and leads to the gents at the rear. There is an hatch in the partition being the off sales, also the door to the servery for staff.

Arbroath

5-7 East Mary Street, Arbroath, DD11 1PR

Tel: (01241) 872524

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11 (12 Mon)-11

Listed Status: Not listed

Foundry Bar ✰

Foundry Bar, Arbroath

Bar

Single-storey, dormer-windowed drinkers' pub with three rooms, that has been in operation since 1861. The small bar retains its original counter with a series of painted panels interspersed with Swan Vesta match-strikers. On top of the counter is a wood gantry some 50 years old that reaches to the ceiling. There is a modest original back gantry on the left; on the right was the former off-sales. The walls retain their original panels and the old fireplace has a lintel with the date 1775. Look for the gauge on the wall from the days when the beer was raised from the cellar to the bar by mains water pressure. The lounge at the rear retains its old panelled walls with bell-pushes at the front; it was extended back in the late 1980s to twice its original size. On the left, two small rooms have been converted to a games room, which retains some old bench seating.

Blairgowrie

101 Perth Street, Blairgowrie, PH10 6DT

Tel: (01250) 873142

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 2-11 Mon-Thu; 11-11 Fri; 12-Midnight Sat; 12.30-10 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Listed Status: Not listed

Stormont Arms ✰

Stormont Arms, Blairgowrie

Public Bar

A little-altered drinkers' pub that stocks its own label 25-year-old blended whisky with a cask strength of 59%. The public bar has a 100-year-old gantry, an old bar counter with a replacement front, and two old whisky mirrors - one for Dewar's, the other for Bell's. The off-sales and its sliding hatch have been retained. The lounge has some fittings from the 1950s and there is another room in a small extension with old fixed seating but the fireplaces have been lost. Unaltered gents'.

Brechin

44 St David Street, Brechin, DD9 6EQ

Tel: (01356) 625405

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Listed Status: Not listed

Brechin Arms ✰

Brechin Arms, Brechin

Servery

A corner site pub with a Victorian gantry with shafts and modern mirrors. The walls of the main bar are fully covered with panelling, perhaps from the 1960s or 1970s. There are two archways to a modern lounge created in a former shop on the right.

Brechin

62 Market Street, Brechin, DD9 6BD

Tel: (01356) 624449

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-11

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals

Listed Status: Not listed

Brown Horse / Stables ✰

Brown Horse / Stables, Brechin

Public Bar

Former hotel retaining three small little-altered rooms, with a lounge added in the 1960s, also barely changed. The original entrance door has a colourful pictorial glass panel and leads to a very small bar on the right with fittings that may date from the early 20th century. The panelled bar counter has a match-striker under the lip and the three-bay back gantry features one large 'Bell's Perth Whisky' mirror centrepiece and four smaller whisky mirrors around it, two on each side. This half-panelled stand-up man's bar has no tables, just a couple of stools. Note the large bell box above one door.

Brechin, Angus

1 Market Street, Brechin, DD9 6BA

Tel: (01356) 625862

Email:

Website:

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Brechin City)

Listed Status: Grade B

Dalhousie ✰

Dalhousie, Brechin Angus

Bar

Red sandstone town centre pub of 1879 with a public bar that has not changed in 50 years. This high-ceilinged space retains its original full-height panelling and horseshoe-shaped counter which may date from the 1950 or 1960s. There is an old gantry but also a modest island fitting, possibly a 1950/1960s addition, which is on wheels and has to be moved to gain access to the cellar below. There is 1930s windows glass advertising ‘Afternoon Teas’, and three old window screens: one is framed on the wall and the other reads ‘Breakfast Luncheons High Teas’.

Broughty Ferry

10-16 Fort Street, Broughty Ferry, DD5 2AD

Tel: (01382) 775941

Email: Fishermans.BroughtyFerry@belhavenpubs.net

Website: http://www.fishermanstavern-broughtyferry.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-midnight (1am Thu-Sat)

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Broughty Ferry)

Food: Lunchtime and Evening Meals (12-2.30, 5-7.30)

Listed Status: Grade C

Fisherman's Tavern ✰

Fisherman

Interior

Early 19th-century former house, licensed since 1857, that has evolved from a traditional terraced pub into a small town hotel in recent years. The low-ceilinged public bar on the right is separated from the snug on the left by a low part-glazed partition. The modest back gantry on the right is old but the one on the left is modern and the bar counter has a 1950/1960s ply frontage. The public bar has original tongue-and-grooved panelled walls, a good Bernard's mirror, 1950/1960s fixed seating and a curious small table with wooden sides that was designed for a ship.

Dundee

117 Strathmartine Road, Dundee, DD3 7SD

Directions: Corner of Moncur Crescent.

Tel: (01382) 810975

Email:

Website:

Opening Hours: 11-Midnight

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Food: (Closed Mon-Thu; 12-2 Fri; Closed Sat&Sun)

Listed Status: Grade C

Frews Bar ★

Frews Bar, Dundee

Lounge

This became a pub in 1915, having previously been a grocery store and was remodelled by local architects Frank and Harry Thomson. It has three rooms, with a public bar of 1915 flanked by a pair of important Art Deco lounges. The public bar has been amalgamated with a tiny snug on the right, by the removal of a short partition (evident in the floor). On the back of one of the tobacco jars ornamenting the inglenook-style fireplace is written ‘H & F Thomson Architect, Alex Fair Wood Carver, John Scott Joiner’ and ‘Mr Stewart Licence Holder 18th October 1915’. The gantry with bevelled mirror panels may well date from 1915 too, although other fittings are more recent. The metal-framed windows are typical inter-war work and the corner ones depict a plough in stained glass. On the right is a lounge with stylish inter-war panelling, counter front and brass bell-pushes. At the rear is a second lounge which also retains its Art Deco fittings, including the metal-fronted counter, small fixed tables and other fittings. This, the ‘Sporting Memories Lounge’, is only open Friday and Saturday, although you may be able to visit on request. The plethora of pictures and sporting memorabilia make it hard to appreciate the full effect of the 1930s work. Listed in 2008 following survey work by CAMRA.

Dundee

91-93 Strathmartine Road, Dundee, DD3 7QY

Tel: None

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Not listed

Glenlivet Bar ✰

Glenlivet Bar, Dundee

Interior

A basic, drinkers' pub with a little-altered 1950s interior. The public bar has panelled walls, a stepped counter front (top is new) and a straightforward mirrored back gantry. On the right, a sitting room, minus door and with a glass panel recently placed in the partition wall is now used for darts. The small sitting room on the left remains intact with panelled walls, bell-pushes, door and fixed seating. Both the ladies' and the gents' are unchanged with terrazzo floors and walls. In the late 1990s, a former sweet shop on the right was converted into a new lounge bar. In 2003 a third of the bar back was cut through to make it easier for the bar staff to see customers waiting for service in the lounge.

Dundee

165-167 Perth Road, Dundee, DD2 1AS

Tel: (01382) 667783

Email:

Website: http://www.speedwell-bar.co.uk

Opening Hours: 11-11; 12.30-11 Sun

Real Ale & Cider: Real Ale

Public Transport: Near Railway Station (Dundee) and Bus Stop

Listed Status: Grade B

Speedwell Bar (Mennies) ★

Speedwell Bar (Mennies), Dundee

Right-hand side of Public Bar

At the base of a four-storey tenement, the Speedwell has a lovely Edwardian interior of 1903 by architects John Bruce & Son for the property developer James Speed, whose name is enshrined in the mosaic at the entrance (his initials also appear at the top of the building opposite). The ‘well’ in the name is because the pub was said to be built on the site of one. It comprises two distinct parts. Right of the central entrance is a large L-shaped bar, which has a most impressive four-tier mirrored gantry. This bar is split into two by a low screen and also has an ornate Jacobean ceiling. To the left are a couple of rooms separated by a glazed screen. Both have wall-panelling, original fireplaces and bell-pushes but the seating is modern. The gents’ is worth a look for their Edwardian lavatorial excellence of mosaic flooring, white tiling, Shanks’ ‘Odourless’ urinals and cistern. At the back of the servery are a couple of dials, the remnants of the old air pressure beer dispense system. The pub has been owned and run by the Stewart family since 1995. Customers are welcome to bring their own food in from neighbouring shops. The pub is still commonly known as ‘Mennie’s’ after the family that kept it from the 1920s to 1995.

Dundee

96-98 Clepington Road, Dundee, DD3 7SW

Tel: (01382) 858953

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade B

The Clep Bar ★

The Clep Bar, Dundee

Interior

Behind the simple single-storey exterior is a truly superb survival. The pub was built (or was perhaps created out of a pair of shops) for Thomas Fitzpatrick, spirit dealer, in 1940-1. It was probably designed by J. MacLellan Brown, the city architect. The dating is very unusual since pub-building generally came to an abrupt full-stop after the outbreak of war. The layout of public bar, lounge, and jug and bottle is just as it was originally. The public bar is U-shaped and has a projecting fireplace behind which are the tiny loos, entered through very narrow doors: the gents, still has original tiling. This main bar has original three-quarter-height panelled walls, plus counter and gantry. The fixed bench seating has a number of solid wooden dividers and the typically Scottish little fixed tables are original too. The delightful lounge also has partitions forming seating bays, more small fixed tables and panelling, together with leaded windows, including one advertising Bernard’s Edinburgh Ales. There are working bell-pushes and those in the lounge are still responded to.

Closed Pubs

The following pubs would have been main entries in this guide had they currently been open.

Aberdeen & Grampian

Craigellachie

, Craigellachie, AB38 9RR

Tel: (01340) 881239

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Fiddichside Inn ★

Fiddichside Inn, Craigellachie

Public Bar

A marvellous rural survival; a tiny bar at the end of a cottage in a beautiful spot by a bridge over the River Fiddich. The pub has been in the owner's family for 88 years. The public bar measures about 10 ft. x 15 ft. with a panelled original counter running down the length of the room and leaving only half of the space for customers. There is not enough room for any tables, only bar stools and a couple of benches. The back gantry is a simple three-bay affair and there is half-height wooden panelling on the walls. Opposite the counter is a coal fire and there are antique William Younger's and Robert Younger's IPA mirrors. That's it - no carpets, no food, no fruit machines, no piped music, no TV, no children - absolute heaven for lovers of unspoilt pubs.

Update 2017: The pub is closed following the death of landlord, Joe Brandie, at the grand old age of 88. Future unknown.

Borders

Tweedsmuir

TWEEDSMUIR, Tweedsmuir, ML12 6QN

Directions: A701, between Moffat and Broughton

Tel: (01899) 880272

Email:

Website: http://www.wtarchitecture.com/the-crook-inn/

Food: (12-2.30, 5.30-8.30(9 Fri-Sun))

Listed Status: Grade C

Crook Inn ★

Crook Inn, Tweedsmuir

Public Bar

An early 19th-century coaching inn (although claimed to date from 1580) with an extension in c.1936. Most of the Art Deco fittings of that era, including the finest surviving ladies’ and gents’ loos, has been retained. Walk through the terrazzo-floored lobby and past the period hotel reception to find Willie Wastle's Bar at the rear. This is just as it was, with a lapped wood door and bar counter, gantry of shelves, stone fireplace with a circular hearth and copper hood. Even the chunky furniture - chairs, tables including a barrel one, and corner seat - is original.

Edinburgh & The Lothians

Edinburgh

88-90 Kirk Brae, Edinburgh, EH16 6JA

Tel: (0131) 672 2823

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Liberton Inn ✰

A three-room pub in a plain, late C19/early C20 building, refitted between the wars. In the stand-up public bar, the basic three-quarter height wall panelling, U-shaped counter, modest island gantry and low window seats are from the refit; this was two rooms until the dividing wall was removed in 2006. The bar counter seems to be the only refit survivor in the small middle lounge. Down a passage to the rear is the two-part Reuben Butler lounge, named after the character in Walter Scott's Heart of Midlothian. Here the counter and fireplace look to be from the 1930s but the gantry is more recent. This room is only open evenings and weekends.

Fife

Leslie

203 High Street, Leslie, KY6 3AZ

Tel: (01592) 742773

Email:

Website:

Listed Status: Grade C

Auld Hoose ★

Auld Hoose, Leslie

Interior

UPDATE October 2016: Closed since July 2016 and on the market.
This terraced drinkers’ pub has been in the same family since 1933 and has an unspoilt, simple interior of a type that must have once been common in Scottish pubs. It has a bar at either end and between them, facing the entrance, a small screened-off jug bar and, to the right of this, a rather larger snug. The walls are panelled to full height even though this is not immediately obvious due to the application of modern paintwork. In the right-hand bar, behind a window in the servery, are the mechanics of the electric air compressor that once dispensed the beer (the associated pressure dials were, sadly, removed recently but still languish at the back of the servery. In the corridor to the loos on the left is a mighty advertising mirror proclaiming ‘Auld Hoose Luncheon Bar Fine Old Cameron Bridge Whisky’. At the rear is the ‘Silver Pheasant’ room, created in the 1960s by the present landlady’s grandmother and still intact, displaying the taste of the day (not to mention the eponymous stuffed pheasant). Advertisements in white enamelled letters (commonly used a century ago) survive in several places.

More to Try

The pubs listed below are classified by CAMRA as having interiors which are ‘of some regional historic importance’. In other words, they do not match up to the pretty exacting criteria for a main entry but, nevertheless, retain a fair degree of heritage interest – be it a largely intact layout, or some cherishable fixtures or fittings, or a particular room worthy of note.

Aberdeen & Grampian

Blue Lamp, Aberdeen, 121 Gallowgate, AB25 1BU, A three-storey granite building, refitted around 1960 and hardly changed since. The ground floor comprises a U-shaped room with floor to ceiling ply panelling. The counter has a panelled front and black Formica top while the gantry has a mirrored back and glass shelves. Also dating from the refit are the doors and the leatherette fixed seating in the left-hand part. The lounge is on the first floor and sports more ply panelling and a similar servery and fixed seating. In 1989, the former soap factory next door was converted to a music lounge and new ground floor toilets were installed (the lounge loos are from the 1960s). Real ale is served from a fount - a rarity these days.

Kings Bar, Aberdeen, 97 King Street, AB24 5AB, A photo on the wall shows the bar counter and gantry have been there years, possibly since the 1930s. It has a mirrored five-bay gantry with two glass-fronted cabinets and a clock on top. It all looks old but bar staff say fire damage to the left hand side in the 1960s so it may be it is a copy or repaired in that area? The good bar counter is over 50 years old but the panelling was added in the late 1990s and the left side panels have been painted battleship grey. The ceiling has been lowered in recent years. Note the brass strips along the top of the counter which were used to light matches. There are two working brass water taps on the counter. There is a small separate lounge / darts area at the rear with new fixed seating.

St Machar Bar, Aberdeen, 97 High Street, Old Aberdeen, AB24 3EN, In an 18th-century building, this long, narrow bar, popular with students, remains little changed for the past 50 years. It has a distinctive 1960s bar counter front of chunky wood laid horizontally. The gantry is of shelves filled with many whiskies, the main one having a Formica top. There is 1960s fixed seating down the left hand side an on the front right area, but it has been re-upholstered. There was a distinctive c.1960 suspended canopy over the counter but it was removed in c.2010 and 1960s panelling has been taken off the walls. There is a splendid Thomson Marshall & Co Queens Ales Aulton Brewery Aberdeen’ mirror at the front right. A snug was removed as part of the c.1960 changes.

Marine Hotel, Stonehaven, 9-10 Shorehead, AB39 2JY, Although opened up, the pub retains many fittings in the left-hand part - old bar counter with console brackets, three bay bar back with columns holding up the shelves and an old curved bench. The full-height panelling has mostly been painted grey or red.

Argyll & The Isles

Kilmartin Hotel, Kilmartin, , PA31 8RQ, Built 1904. The small bar on the left side of the hotel is little changed in 80+ years. It retains a splendid gantry with three advertising mirrors for Grant's Standfast; Wm Younger & Sons Pale Ale; and Wm Youngers World Renowned Ales. The only change to the gantry is the removal of some shelves to accommodate a glass washing machine. The counter is also the original and the stone fireplace is unchanged. There is a small lounge / pool room at the rear in a 1960s extension - you will notice the small bar counter is a good copy of the counter in the public bar. There are dining and other rooms in the hotel section to the right. There was a serious fire in c.1970 (poss. 1968) so unlikely there are any other old fittings.

Borders

Glue Pot, Galashiels, 65 Overhaugh Street, TD1 1DL, A back street local with some early 20th century fittings. The remains of the former jug bar can be seen as you enter while the public bar has a bare wood floor, panelled walls, wood-surround fireplace, an oldish counter and a genuinely old gantry with bevilled mirror panels.

Bridge Inn [Trust], Peebles, Portbrae, EH45 8AW, An old pub rebuilt in 1900 in connection with the rebuilding of the adjacent River Tweed bridge. The exterior has prominent timbered gables. The large main room retains an old bar-counter possibly from inter-war times with two old water taps (one still used) but a modern bar-top. The bar-gantry with small drawers is also possibly inter-war; the pedimented top section (above the mirrors) is an addition of c.2000. The intact Gents’ toilets have Twyfords Adamant urinals, sink and taps; also glazed brick walls to two-thirds height and quarry-tiled floor.

Neidpath Inn, Peebles, 27- 29 Old Town, EH45 8JF, Built as a private house in Mid-Victorian times, it was converted into a pub in 1910. A passage with a fielded panelled dado runs from the front left door to the rear where there is a modern lounge. On the right, the L-shaped public bar has a mirrored gantry added in 1910 with two main bays and a walkway for staff in the centre. The old bar counter has match strikers along the front and an old (no longer working) 'Alan & Bogle, Glasgow' water tap on the bar, but it has lost its trough along the base. There is a good wood surround and brick fireplace with a bevelled mirror in the mantelpiece. A small snug on the left has disappeared.

Dumfries & Galloway

Waverley Bar, Dumfries, 48 Lovers Walk, DG1 1LX, Public bar has a curved ply panelled bar counter from the inter-war years and with a trough all along its base. The gantry is more 1960s or later with glass shelves. The walls have 1960s ply panelling throughout to picture frame height. There is a 1930s (or 1950s?) brick fireplace on the right painted red. The fixed seating looks 1960s. Gents’ with half doors has 1930s Shanks & Co. Barrhead urinals. An arch at the rear right leads to a small room / snug with some more 1960s ply panelled walls and modern fixed seating.

Edinburgh & The Lothians

Deacon Brodies Tavern, Edinburgh, 435 Lawnmarket, EH1 2NT, Although this famous pub of 1894 has been much altered inside, it retains its mirrored timber gantry and pilastered bar counter. Note also the two early 19th century engravings and the ornate painted ceiling, exposed during renovations in the 1980s.

Grosvenor, Edinburgh, 26-28 Shandwick Place, EH2 4RT, The splendidly ornamental and elaborate seven-bay gantry and long panelled bar counter in the former Buffet Bar date from a quality refit in 1903.; both edifices display considerable panache. The moulded ceiling and decorative cornice add to the attractions.

Guildford Arms, Edinburgh, 1 West Register St., EH2 2AA, Most of the grand interior dates from the 1896 opening and is a fine example of Victorian rococo - best viewed from the gallery above the main bar. The deep-etched windows are still largely intact as is the revolving door. The ornate island counter is, though, a 1970 replacement.

Waterloo Bar, Edinburgh, 3 Waterloo Place, EH1 3BG, Within an elegant three-storey stone building of 1818 designed by Archibald Elliot is this tiny high-ceilinged bar that retains its 100-year-old gantry. The gantry has seven bays with tall pedimented ones on the left and right ends and an arched one in the middle; it has mirrors and ornately carved columns. The bar counter and panelling are relatively modern.

Swanny's, Edinburgh, Leith, 32 North Junction Street, EH6 6HP, A locals pub with some old bar fittings, notably the curved panelled counter in the public bar with its pilasters and carved brackets. The four-bay gantry also looks old though only one and a half bays now serve as back fittings.

Auld Hoose, North Berwick, 19 Forth Street, EH39 4HX, The public bar here retains its original three-bay mirrored gantry with eight carved pillars and six old spirit barrels. The three water taps on the counter no longer work. Other worthwhile features are the tall front windows with etched panels, panelled walls and a good cornice.

Commercial Inn, West Calder, 30 East End, EH55 8AD, Worth a look for its ornately carved and pilastered bar counter with grapes, brackets and rose symbols spaced along the top. The walls sport unusual panelling topped with a modest frieze and a florid cornice.

Fife

Coaledge Tavern, Crossgates, Mossgreen, KY4 8BU, Small village pub in a stone built terrace. It has an over 100 year old semi-circular bar counter with some water taps, which takes up a lot of the interior space. The splendid island gantry is apparently cut down and there are some back gantry shelves. The interior was last changed in the 1960s when a small area on the rear right was opened-up. There are a number of advertising mirrors but the stone fireplace is modern.

Greater Glasgow & Clyde Valley

Cross Stobs Inn, Barrhead, 2-6 Grahamston Road, G78 1NS, Inter-war fittings are the main point of interest here. The public has a ply-panelled bar counter with a trough round the base whilst the pool room has a thirties fireplace with bell pushes either side. The lounge is modernised but, unusually, has a bell to attract service on the counter.

Griffin Bar, Glasgow, Charing Cross, Bath Street, G2 4JP, Some superb remnants still exist from a grand remodelling in Art Nouveau style in 1903-4 under architect William Reid, but they are just remnants, following crass alterations in the 1960s. The exterior, however, still retains much of the exciting, original flavour. Inside, the counter front and base of the gantry are original but the most interesting work is around the periphery with clear remains of snugs behind wide, arched openings, including stained glass work.

Imperial Bar, Glasgow, City Centre, 6 Howard Street, G1 4AZ, The elegant three or four bay gabled gantry is old with some modern wood added and some glass shelves. Near the front window there is a large antique ‘Schweppes Table Waters’ mirror from the Glasgow workshop of Forrest and Son. Has a semi-circular bar counter with a row of small modern tiles along the top and as the wooden front is of a similar style to the dado panelling it may be old. On the rear wall the fielded panelling is poss. 40 years old and above it are three excellent colourful stained glass panels. Good cornice. Has a mosaic floor in the doorway. Vestibule entrance with glass but does not look that old. Seating areas are not that old.. Has an old ‘Lavatory’ illuminated sign above the door to the toilets.

Tolbooth, Glasgow, Merchant City, 11 Saltmarket, G1 5NA, A single-storey building with balustrade adjoining a tenement block by architect Sir J J Burnet, 1899-1900 for the Caledonian Railway Co, and including a ventilation opening for a railway tunnel below. The bar was partially extended over the ventilation opening by Cullen, Lochhead & Brown of Hamilton in 1906. There has been much modernisation, but some virtuoso engraved glass is retained, and the finest feature is a richly-modelled Edwardian two-sided five-bay gantry - one of Scotland's finest - featuring elaborate carving and mirrors; but all lower shelves are lost to fridges. Most other fittings in the bar date from the 1970s.

Loch Lomond, Stirling & The Trossachs

Anchor Tavern, Bo'ness, 42-54 North Street, EH51 0AG, This small stone-built town pub of 1891 has a public bar with original back gantry with carved columns and Usher's India Pale Ale and Taylor's & Ferguson Scotch Whisky mirrors. The bar has post-war ply-panelled walls, an attractive geometric-patterned ceiling, and two good stained and leaded window screens. The original bar counter has a post-war ribbed hardboard frontage and a water tap on top. There used to be a small snug on the left, but the short partition enclosing it was removed in 2008. The windows and tiled floor are modern.

Tayside

Strath Bar, Dundee, 184 Strathmartin Road, DD3 8DQ, A basic corner local with two bars remain virtually untouched since the last refit, perhaps in the late 1950s or 1960s. The left-hand one is the larger of the two and has walls lined with imitation panelling. It is said that a refurbishment is planned for 2016 which may change things considerably.

Cherrybank Inn, Perth, 210 Glasgow Road, PH2 0NA, Two of the four rooms in this drovers' inn of 1761 retain old fittings, The wee snug with a 'Private' sign on the sliding door is a charming mix of thirties and sixties features whilst the public bar has an inter-war gantry and old panelling.

Protecting Heritage Pubs Through Listing

Around half the pubs in this guide meet the strict criteria to be statutorily ‘listed’ as buildings of national architectural and historic interest. Historic Scotland (HS), on behalf of the Scottish Executive, has created the following three categories:

Category A Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of a particular period, style or building type.

Category B Buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered.

Category C Buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style or building type, as originally constructed or altered, and simple, traditional buildings which group well with others in categories A and B or part of a planned group such as an estate or an industrial complex.

Listed Building Consent must be obtained where proposals would alter the character of the listed building. This applies regardless of the category and to work affecting both the outside and inside. Applications are made to the local planning authority which will consider applications in the light of the various guidance and policy documents issued by HS. Planning authorities must notify HS of their intention to grant consent on any category A or B buildings and for all demolitions, regardless of category.

Ten pubs in this guide are A listed with a further 34 being B listed and the same number C listed. All the other pubs are currently unlisted.

CAMRA has been active in nominating pubs for listing and will continue to do so – we consider that quite a few of the unlisted pubs in this guide have sufficient heritage importance to warrant listing.